Recent Blog Posts

New Age of Fashion: Dutch Designer Meshes 3D Technology and Haute Couture

One of fashion's newest trends is the utilization of 3D printing technology to produce custom made clothing, footwear, and jewelry. ...

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Amazon’s Loss to Lush

Lush is a beauty brand that produces products from fresh organic fruit and vegetables. Their products such as makeup, soap, ...

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Ready to Expand to China? Don't Wait to Register Your Brand

By Diana Chan | amdlawgroup.com Because of the sheer number of people (and potential consumers), businesses are often drawn to the ...

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HOW TO PROTECT YOUR DESIGN AS A TRADEMARK

Sometimes patenting an invention to protect how it is made or the way it works doesn’t cut it. Sometimes a ...

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Peter Fonda Brings Suit for ‘Easy Rider’ Shirts Against Dolce & Gabbana, Nordstrom

Italian luxury fashion designers Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana have been caught in a fresh legal bind, this time over ...

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Isn’t It Obvious? A Look at the Effect of Obviousness in Patent Law

A major requirement for patentability is non-obviousness. However, tests for obviousness have changed as of recently. Through discussion of the ...

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Hey, DJ Keep Playin’ That Song… Unless You Didn’t Pay For It!

By Breanna Pendilton | amdlawgroup.com
Hey, DJ
“Mic check, 1..2..1..2!” With the summer time here and the fall vastly approaching, we find ourselves in the season of parties: wedding parties, graduation parties, and soon, back-to-school parties. And with parties, come people, music, and DJs. While these three things are normal for every party, these three things can also put you at risk for violation of a federal copyright law. (Ask yourself, “Is the roof really on fire?’)

What is the definition of a “Born Global” firm? International Business Law – Case Study #2

The definition of a born global firm is “a business organization that, from inception, seeks to derive significant competitive advantage from the use of resources and the sale of outputs in multiple countries.” Many companies go global, but that does not make them born global firms. What distinguishes born global firms from the rest of international organizations is that they originate internationally. Born global firms, from their beginnings, have a global focus and commit their resources to international ventures. Most companies operate from their home country, and after years of doing business domestically, slowly evolve to do business internationally. By contrast, born global firms begin with a borderless world view, and immediately develop strategies to expand themselves abroad. Born global firms have many distinctive features that allow them to start, and thrive in the international arena.

How and when to protect your intellectual property in your small business

Bravo to all the small business owners that have the bravery, vision and drive to create something incredible and novel in the marketplace. Every business starts out from an idea. No matter where you are in the stage of solidifying your business idea or executing your business plan, intellectual property is a substantial part of the plan and you want to timely and correctly protect this valuable asset, especially as you try to get your endeavor off the ground by marketing and advertising your product or service.

Thinking About Re-Branding?

By Diana Chan | amdlawgroup.com
Many brands that we know and easily recognize today have undergone re-branding campaigns by changing aspects of their logos and how they market to consumers. There are many reasons for re-branding, which include boosting sales and also revamping a company’s image.

Elton John’s Copyright Woes – International Intellectual Property Law – Case Study #9

Music legend Elton John is filing his legal documents to dismiss a copyright infringement suit filed in Illinois back in April by singer/songwriter Guy Hobbs. Hobbs alleges that the composer lyricist team of Elton Hohn and Bernie Taupin stole lyrics from his 1983 title “Natasha” for their title “Nikita” released two years later.

Market Segmentation and Intellectual Property

Intellectual property is a very important resource, and it is no surprise Forbes Magazine has called it among the most important resources in the 21st century. Despite what product or service a business makes or provides, intellectual property is being created and used in some way. Whether it be a trademark or confidential information, it is important for a business to protect its intellectual property.

My Name and My Trademark… Yep, It’s the Same Thing!

Over the past two years, the United States Patent and Trademark Office, has granted British singer and songwriter, Rita Ora, federal protection over the use of the mark “Rita Ora”. That’s right, her name is now registered as a valid trade and service mark for concert souvenirs, clothes, hair and makeup accessories, music recordings, and even her performances and/or services as a singer and songwriter.

No Major Holiday Discounts for Michael Kors

Just when we thought the holiday season could not arrive any sooner, companies have already geared up for holiday shopping. Starbucks has begun promoting its holiday red cup and seasonal flavors, while the Wall Street Journal has set up a “Christmas Sale Tracker” that updates every hour to help readers monitor prices for the “hottest gifts.” As consumers prepare to buy gifts, they typically are looking for popular items at the lowest price. Michael Kors, however, is not planning on offering any promotion deals.

First Step to Federally Protecting Your Trademark

By Ann Marie Sallusti | amdlawgroup.com
Trademarks are not just a mark on a product. Trademarks make products identifiable to consumers and are essentially the product that is being sold. Trademarks “may” be federally registered with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), but registration is not mandatory in the United States. Unlike most countries, the United States follows the first to use rule when protecting trademark rights. The first to use rule protects the trademark rights of the first party who uses the trademark of a certain product or service in commerce. Therefore, if a creator satisfies the requirement of using the trademark in commerce in the United States, the creator’s work will be protected. On the other hand, most other countries follow the first to file rule when protecting trademark rights, which protects the trademark rights of the first party to file an application and receive registration for a certain product or service.

People must LIKE to sue Facebook

Originally posted 2013-02-18 19:01:00. “People must LIKE to sue Facebook” By. Kathleen Melhorn, AMD Law Staff Writer             For the umpteenth time, Facebook is facing copyright infringement charges this week. After a Dutch family realized Facebook had very similar features to the invention made by their deceased kin, a lawsuit was issued. A  Dutch programmer […]

Tebow Trades Cleats for CURE

Former NFL standout quarterback, now sports analyst, Timothy Richard Tebow has achieved much in his young career. Tebow was a Heisman Trophy winner twice in college at The University of Florida, and has enjoyed a somewhat fulfilling career at the NFL level. These accomplishments, have allowed Tebow to take his brand international to create The Tebow CURE hospital. A hospital that will be dedicated to impoverished children in Davao City, Philippines.