Where to incorporate? – Delaware, Wisconsin, Nevada, or at Home?

By Ann Marie Sallusti | amdlawgroup.com
According to the internal affairs doctrine the state of incorporation will govern dealings and issues that are internal to the corporation, including but not limited to, fiduciary duties, shareholder rights, and other particular corporate issues. On the other hand, issues that are external to the operation of the corporation may be brought elsewhere. Therefore, a business owner’s decision to incorporate in a certain state determines what corporate law will govern the entity. A business owner should take legal issues, taxes, fees and incorporation requirements into consideration when deciding where to incorporate. Recently, business owners have been contemplating three states when determining where to incorporate – Delaware, Wisconsin and Nevada.

Brand Interaction: Take it from a Millennial

By Christina Severino | amdlawgroup.com
Although Baby Boomers still control roughly 70% the U.S.’s total disposable income, targeting “Gen Y” consumers is still a necessary evil for all brands. Generational gaps (both economically and socially) have turned the tables on brands, who are now struggling to keep up with the flighty and sometimes unpredictable behaviors of “Gen-Y”. A 2013 survey by Accenture.com claims that Millennials who use social media are 28% more likely to make a purchase because of a social media recommendation. It is not enough that they simply “like” the brand to make them loyal customers.

Trademark Squatting Gets Nowhere: Dsquared2 Won Back Its Legal Distributorship in China

Originally posted 2014-01-21 17:10:02. By Sindy Wenjin Ding | amdlawgroup.com A big periodic victory belongs to Dsquared2. This well-known fashion brand successfully secured its legal distributorship in China after experiencing a really hard time fighting for the legitimate sources for distribution of its products. The court in Hangzhou, in the decision, gave a green light […]

New Moves for an Old Can

Why get up and throw trash in the can, when you can toss trash anywhere and the can moves to you? The Smart Trash Can does just that, with help from a sensor and computer, the can knows where your trash will fall and moves by itself to catch the trash before it hits the ground. A Japanese engineer, Minoru Kurata, created the Smart Trash Can that uses a wall-mounted sensor to pick up the direction of the thrown trash.

Lock Down and Keep Your Trademark Active

Make sure you are informed about all of the maintenance steps to keep your trademark active and alive in the USPTO database. You will not receive a call, email or any notice if your trademark is out of maintenance. Ensure that you make the proper filings and pay the proper fees and keep your hard earned registered trademark active.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT PROTECTING YOUR APP

The billion dollars app boom is far from being over! A recent study carried out by GIGAOM for the European Commission (https://ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/en/news/sizing-eu-app-economy) shows how apps are going to substantially contribute to the future global economy and how app developers are going to take the global lead. It is important, for app developers, to know how to obtain protection for their ideas at first, and in the end for their developed apps.

Does a Primate have a Copyrightable Interest in its “Selfie”?

By Christina Severino | amdlawgroup.com
Recently, the Wikimedia Foundation was asked by British nature photographer David Slater to remove a “selfie” photograph taken by a primate with his camera. The Foundation refused, reasoning that because animals cannot hold a copyrightable interest, the images were in the “public domain”. As a result, Mr. Slater will likely pursue a legal action against the Foundation because the individual who uploaded the photo has not been located. His proposed argument is that the primate served as his assistant, thus affording him the copyright interest in the photos uploaded.

Protecting Your Brand: U.S. Customs and Border Patrol

By Diana Chan | amdlawgroup.com
Last summer, the United States Customs & Border Patrol (CBP) in Los Angeles, California, seized over 16,000 counterfeit Hermès handbags, valued at $295,665. If they were genuine Hermès handbags, the total retail price would have been nearly $211 million. In May of this year, CBP in Jersey City, New Jersey, intercepted 185 counterfeit guitars bearing trademarks such as Gibson, Les Paul, and Martin. The counterfeit guitars were being sold for $200 to $500, while the retail price of genuine models range from $2,000 to $54,000.

Infringement and Nintendo

Originally posted 2013-02-28 16:49:53. Tasha Schmidt, Staff Writer, AMD Law Photo courtesy of http://www.flickr.com/photos/jdhancock/7629235266/ I am sure many of you who play or have played video games do not think of all the work that goes into creating them. However, these inventors put a lot of work into their creations and it is understandable that […]