Protecting Your Brand: From the Factory to the Stores

By Breanna Pendilton | amdlawgroup.com
It is important as a designer that you protect the image and reputation of your brand. In other words, you want the product that is hanging in the stores to be the product that you produced in the factory; nothing less and nothing more. This seems to be a common problem with “off the rack” designers. Even though you can no longer monitor the day to day whereabouts of your designs after it leaves your supervision, you still have rights which may help protect your brand in the future.

The Not So iLife of Apple

Originally posted 2013-02-18 19:05:00. “The Not So iLife of Apple” By Kathleen Melhorn, AMD Law Staff Writer With the entire hype surrounding apple, one would assume it was the only company to use the “i” before the name of the product it was selling. Unfortunately, this is not true in Brazil where Apple has been […]

John Wayne Family Loses Round One to Duke University in Trademark Fight

As a fan of the great John Wayne you should be aware that he was referred as “Duke,” “Duke Morrison,” “Duke Wayne,” “Duke and The Duke” — a nickname that derived from his boyhood dog named Duke. John Wayne Enterprises, a Newport Beach Corporation filed a trademark application back in 2013 for the marks “Duke” and “Duke John Wayne” for alcoholic beverages excluding beers.

Apple doesn’t make the same mistake twice (Kathleen Melhorn, Staff Writer)

Instead of facing infringement charges or risking winding up in court again, Apple filed seven trademarks this week. The patents Apple filed would protect the application icons in the new iPod Nano device coming out soon. A website called “Patently Apple” which focuses solely around Apple’s inventions, breaks down the entire file for the trademarks. Viewers are able to see all details down to the colors that they would like to own for the application icons.

Merchandise Designers, Hold the Confetti! The Redskins’ Name and Logo are Not Open for Business…

By Ozelle Martin | amdlawgroup.com
There is a well-known professional football team in the National Football League (NFL) called the Washington Redskins and their logo features a Native American man wearing a feathered headdress. While the franchise has been in existence for over 80 years, there has been much debate surrounding the connotation of the term “redskins.” Moreover, a quick search of the Oxford dictionary defines the term as “an American Indian” with a note that the term is deemed “offensive.” Consequently, the Washington Redskins franchise has found itself in the midst of many fiery discussions as to whether the franchise should be allowed to legally own and utilize the name.

Trademark Squatting Gets Nowhere: Dsquared2 Won Back Its Legal Distributorship in China

Originally posted 2014-01-21 17:10:02. By Sindy Wenjin Ding | amdlawgroup.com A big periodic victory belongs to Dsquared2. This well-known fashion brand successfully secured its legal distributorship in China after experiencing a really hard time fighting for the legitimate sources for distribution of its products. The court in Hangzhou, in the decision, gave a green light […]

Parody or Trademark Infringement? The Tale of Print T-Shirts

By Ozelle Martin | amdlawgroup.com
Lately, there seems to be a sudden burst in the number of print t-shirt lines that bear designs that are strikingly similar to those of well-known luxury brands such as Chanel, Gucci, Louis Vuitton, and Givenchy. Undoubtedly, these print t-shirt creators have ventured such a path, in an effort to appeal to the audiences of these very brands to whom they have become parasitic. With ammunition, in the form of potent legal departments, in tow- many of these brands are shooting off cease and desist letters like paintballs. Very often, their claim is that the printed t-shirt creators are infringing upon their marks. In response, the printed t-shirt creators raise their shields and assert that their inspired designs are mere parodies, a defense borrowed from copyright law’s fair use doctrine.

Fashion Inspiration: Halle Berry

By Mercedes Joshua | amdlawgroup.com
Halle Maria Berry is an American actress and former fashion model. She has won an Academy Award for Best Actress, becoming the first and, as of 2014, the only African American woman to win an Oscar for a leading role. She was one of the highest paid actresses in Hollywood during the 2000s and has been involved in the production side of several of the films in which she performed. She is also a Revlon spokes model. Clearly, Halle Berry has accomplished a lot in her career and on her road to success she became a role model to young women.

Prince Rocks The Courthouse: Copyright Protection

Pop music icon and recently deceased recording artist Prince was well known for his legendary songwriting, epic guitar skills, and flamboyant fashion style but also for his relentless pursuit of copyright infringement. In 2007, Prince declared war on The Pirate Bay, a torrent based online music sharing website, and filed a lawsuit which ultimately led to a $3.6 million verdict and even jail time for the website’s operators. Prince had received public backlash on numerous occasions for attempting to takedown fan websites that use his image and likeness.

4 Ways to Protect Your Trade Secrets Abroad

At the 25th session of the U.S.-China Joint Commission on Commerce and Trade (JCCT), intellectual property rights were emphasized with a focus on trade secrets. Trade secrets have been a core concern among foreign companies in China. Lack of enforcement has been attributed to things like China’s limited experience with trade secret cases and reluctance on the part of the local governments to take on complex cases because of the time and resources involved.

Are B-Corp’s Better for Business?

On the question are B-Corp’s are better for business? It is clear that B-Corp’s are better for society. Over 26 states are changing the corporate landscape. These states capitalizing on one of the largest entrepreneurial and business booms of this decade. Most are familiar with the three, most prevalent, kinds of corporate formation structures in the U.S.; the C Corporation; the S Corporation, and the Limited Liability Company also known as the LLC. But 26 states, including the District of Columbia, have adopted a new form of business model; the B-Corporation. The B-Corporation represents a business model that promotes socially responsible investing, corporate social responsibility, and social entrepreneurship; while remaining profitable.