Brand Interaction: Take it from a Millennial

By Christina Severino | amdlawgroup.com
Although Baby Boomers still control roughly 70% the U.S.’s total disposable income, targeting “Gen Y” consumers is still a necessary evil for all brands. Generational gaps (both economically and socially) have turned the tables on brands, who are now struggling to keep up with the flighty and sometimes unpredictable behaviors of “Gen-Y”. A 2013 survey by Accenture.com claims that Millennials who use social media are 28% more likely to make a purchase because of a social media recommendation. It is not enough that they simply “like” the brand to make them loyal customers.

SMILE! BUT DO NOT INFRINGE MY TRADEMARK!

By Eliana Rocchi | amdlawgroup.com
Can emoticons become trademarks? Apparently yes, as there are several federally registered trademarks that are in fact emoticons. The “smiley”, for example is used by clothing and jewelry companies, perfumes producers and souvenirs retailers. The “winkey” is used for alcoholic beverages. Even the “frowny” is used as a trademark for companies producing clothing and greeting cards.

Fashion Law: What Threatens Your Brand Value & What Causes the Invasion of Online Piracies? (2)

Originally posted 2014-01-16 16:35:46. By Sindy Wenjin Ding | amdlawgroup.com             2.    What Causes the Invasion             First of all, as cyberspace/public domain has become an open gateway, there are no boundaries on geography, time, buyers, identity of sellers, etc., in this invisible cyberspace market. The […]

Michael Kors… Or Michael Yours…and Hers…and His

By Breanna Pendilton | amdlawgroup.com
The Michael Kors brand is arguably one of the most expensive and well-known labels in today’s fashion world. But these same characteristics, (expensive and well-known) are exactly what’s destroying the reputation of this brand. Outlet stores and small business are jacking down the prices, and while the good ole’ Michael Kors’ stores still exist, customers are much more apt to buying them cheaper at other discount stores and retailers.

Critiquing Fashion: Where to Start and How to Improve Fashion Critique

By Diana Chan | amdlawgroup.com
How do we critique fashion? What is fashion? How is it defined? Is fashion defined by the trends? or the uniqueness? or the quality? or the time period? There are such diverse brands, cuts, fabrics, accessories, colors that at first glance, fashion doesn’t seem like the type of industry that can be critically analyzed. There are too many factors, nothing is standard, and it is continually changing. Unlike art, the fashion industry is heavily business-oriented and centered on hard-pressed deadlines and at times mass production. So how can we critique fashion?

4 Ways to Protect Your Trade Secrets Abroad

At the 25th session of the U.S.-China Joint Commission on Commerce and Trade (JCCT), intellectual property rights were emphasized with a focus on trade secrets. Trade secrets have been a core concern among foreign companies in China. Lack of enforcement has been attributed to things like China’s limited experience with trade secret cases and reluctance on the part of the local governments to take on complex cases because of the time and resources involved.

Are You Collaborating or Just Copying?

Let’s be honest! Some of the best music you’ve ever heard are music collaborations. It’s one of the best ways that you can make your work original, but it is also one of the most dangerous ways to have your work stripped from you (That is, if you do not adhere to the rules of copyright law). Before remixing, sampling, and/or collaborating on music, here are four things you should know.

You Can’t Have My Blessing…Or The Music!

By Breanna Pendilton | amdlawgroup.com
Copyright law is founded upon the theory that it will promote and incentivize new works, while also giving credit to the originator.  But what happens when the owner of that work, will not share it?  Does that promote and incentivize new works?  Lifetime has recently announced its plans to make a biopic of the late singer Aaliyah, who died tragically in a plane crash at the age of 22 in 2001.  Her family, who was not contacted about the biopic, is not happy, and feels as if Aaliyah’s life was enough of a story to be told on the big screen.  But what can they really do right?  I mean, Aaliyah’s life, itself, is nothing but a bunch of facts.  In the eyes of copyright law, facts are not copyrightable, and Aaliyah’s family does not own her life story.

Fashion Inspiration: Maya Angelou

Mercedes Joshua | amdlawgroup.com
Fashion inspiration can come from anyone, but the person I believe to really inspire fashion is Dr. Maya Angelou. She was one of the most renowned and influential voices of our time. She encouraged people and inspired them to be something more and, without realizing it, she also became a fashion icon. Because she was such a role model to young black women, they looked up to her in everything she did and what she wore. Dr. Angelou was a great poet, memoirist, novelist, educator, dramatist, producer, actress, historian, filmmaker, and civil rights activist. She also never conformed to social stereotypes when it came to clothes. She had a very classic and modern look all at the same time. She always looked so comfortable in whatever she was wearing. Her clothes truly expressed who she was, a classy woman.

First Step to Federally Protecting Your Trademark

By Ann Marie Sallusti | amdlawgroup.com
Trademarks are not just a mark on a product. Trademarks make products identifiable to consumers and are essentially the product that is being sold. Trademarks “may” be federally registered with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), but registration is not mandatory in the United States. Unlike most countries, the United States follows the first to use rule when protecting trademark rights. The first to use rule protects the trademark rights of the first party who uses the trademark of a certain product or service in commerce. Therefore, if a creator satisfies the requirement of using the trademark in commerce in the United States, the creator’s work will be protected. On the other hand, most other countries follow the first to file rule when protecting trademark rights, which protects the trademark rights of the first party to file an application and receive registration for a certain product or service.

People must LIKE to sue Facebook

Originally posted 2013-02-18 19:01:00. “People must LIKE to sue Facebook” By. Kathleen Melhorn, AMD Law Staff Writer             For the umpteenth time, Facebook is facing copyright infringement charges this week. After a Dutch family realized Facebook had very similar features to the invention made by their deceased kin, a lawsuit was issued. A  Dutch programmer […]

6 THINGS TO REMEMBER ABOUT BRAND PROTECTION AND SOCIAL MEDIA

Today’s expansion of social media websites has created a lot of new opportunities for companies to promote their brand, allowing for new forms of interactivity with countless customers simultaneously. At the same time, though, social networking websites like Facebook or Twitter also make it easier to lose control over one’s brand as anyone can create a Facebook or a Twitter account that contains the company’s brand name or engage in unauthorized uses of their trademark and the magnitude of information going through those websites is hardly easy to control. Here you can find some tips that will help in devising a safe and effective social media strategy without endangering your brand.