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Movements in Fashion: Gender Neutral Fashion Styling

One of the new trends circulating in the fashion industry is gender-neutral fashion. Natalia Manzocco, the owner of Future is the Future, is a part of this movement. Future is the Future is a website that sells gender-neutral clothing and accessories.

Manzocco, a resident of Canada, spends hours on websites sifting through preowned pieces that can highlight both men’s muscles and women’s curves. The 27-year-old is on a crusade to break gender divisions in stores. Manzocco’s crusade began when she wanted to mix menswear pieces into her own wardrobe.

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TRADEMARK INFRINGEMENT versus PUBLIC DOMAIN

By Eliana Rocchi | amdlawgroup.com
The expression “Public domain” is generally used with reference to the works that belong to everyone and are available for public use. The concept comes from copyright law. It identifies those creative works that are not protected by copyright and thus may be used freely by the public. In other words anyone can copy them or modify them or generally use them in any way they wish.

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Brand Interaction: Take it from a Millennial

By Christina Severino | amdlawgroup.com
Although Baby Boomers still control roughly 70% the U.S.’s total disposable income, targeting “Gen Y” consumers is still a necessary evil for all brands. Generational gaps (both economically and socially) have turned the tables on brands, who are now struggling to keep up with the flighty and sometimes unpredictable behaviors of “Gen-Y”. A 2013 survey by Accenture.com claims that Millennials who use social media are 28% more likely to make a purchase because of a social media recommendation. It is not enough that they simply “like” the brand to make them loyal customers.

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First Step to Federally Protecting Your Trademark

By Ann Marie Sallusti | amdlawgroup.com
Trademarks are not just a mark on a product. Trademarks make products identifiable to consumers and are essentially the product that is being sold. Trademarks “may” be federally registered with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), but registration is not mandatory in the United States. Unlike most countries, the United States follows the first to use rule when protecting trademark rights. The first to use rule protects the trademark rights of the first party who uses the trademark of a certain product or service in commerce. Therefore, if a creator satisfies the requirement of using the trademark in commerce in the United States, the creator’s work will be protected. On the other hand, most other countries follow the first to file rule when protecting trademark rights, which protects the trademark rights of the first party to file an application and receive registration for a certain product or service.

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Why Retailers Like Nasty Gal And Forever 21 Get Away With Knockoffs

Originally posted 2015-06-08 11:56:44. (By Kelsey Laugel – www.amdlawgroup.com) At the 2015 Billboard Music Awards in May, Nasty Gal, an American-based retailer that specializes in providing more affordable versions of designer clothing, claimed credit for Taylor Swift’s white Balmain jumpsuit. For comparison, the average Balmain jumpsuit can cost anywhere from $2,000 to $6,000 while the […]

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Why Women Will Continue Wearing Coach Handbags: The Psychology Behind Your Brand

Christina Serverino | amdlawgroup.com
Following my post last week regarding the blunders of outlet mall fashion, my curiosity led me to further focus on why (despite being out of style or season) consumers continue to flock in droves to discount retailers such as these, oftentimes in a stint of wanton disregard for the authority of the omnipresent “Fashion Police”. This curiosity led me to a Google search unveiling a patchwork of blog entries and even scholarly articles addressing the societal and scientific impact of consumer behavior and turnover rate of trends. The approaches of the bloggers and scientists seemed contradictory to one another: Bloggers expressed flagrant hostility towards certain trends, while researchers seemed to discredit such convictions, suggesting that the lust for luxury prevails. So what exactly is driving consumers to covet for couture: the product itself or elicited attention of the brand?

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The Not So iLife of Apple

Originally posted 2013-02-18 19:05:00. “The Not So iLife of Apple” By Kathleen Melhorn, AMD Law Staff Writer With the entire hype surrounding apple, one would assume it was the only company to use the “i” before the name of the product it was selling. Unfortunately, this is not true in Brazil where Apple has been […]

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Parody or Trademark Infringement? The Tale of Print T-Shirts

By Ozelle Martin | amdlawgroup.com
Lately, there seems to be a sudden burst in the number of print t-shirt lines that bear designs that are strikingly similar to those of well-known luxury brands such as Chanel, Gucci, Louis Vuitton, and Givenchy. Undoubtedly, these print t-shirt creators have ventured such a path, in an effort to appeal to the audiences of these very brands to whom they have become parasitic. With ammunition, in the form of potent legal departments, in tow- many of these brands are shooting off cease and desist letters like paintballs. Very often, their claim is that the printed t-shirt creators are infringing upon their marks. In response, the printed t-shirt creators raise their shields and assert that their inspired designs are mere parodies, a defense borrowed from copyright law’s fair use doctrine.

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Does a Primate have a Copyrightable Interest in its “Selfie”?

By Christina Severino | amdlawgroup.com
Recently, the Wikimedia Foundation was asked by British nature photographer David Slater to remove a “selfie” photograph taken by a primate with his camera. The Foundation refused, reasoning that because animals cannot hold a copyrightable interest, the images were in the “public domain”. As a result, Mr. Slater will likely pursue a legal action against the Foundation because the individual who uploaded the photo has not been located. His proposed argument is that the primate served as his assistant, thus affording him the copyright interest in the photos uploaded.

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4 Ways to Protect Your Trade Secrets Abroad

At the 25th session of the U.S.-China Joint Commission on Commerce and Trade (JCCT), intellectual property rights were emphasized with a focus on trade secrets. Trade secrets have been a core concern among foreign companies in China. Lack of enforcement has been attributed to things like China’s limited experience with trade secret cases and reluctance on the part of the local governments to take on complex cases because of the time and resources involved.

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Road to the ITC is paved with Patent Trolls

Part of the International Trade Commission (ITC)’s job is to protect U.S. industry by monitoring foreign imports. The ITC can prevent goods from entering the country—including for infringement of IP. And it can issue only one remedy for infringements—an injunction. No money, just exclusion orders that stop violators in their tracks. And this is exactly why legitimate businesses and questionable businesses alike have raced down the road to the ITC.

What does that have to do with money-grubbing patent trolls?

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