Reinventing the Pizza Won’t Get You Trademark Protection

Last week, Judge Costa of the Southern District Court of Texas (Galveston Division) ruled against New York Pizzeria, Inc. (NYPI) on its claims for damages regarding infringement of its flavors and plating methods of its menu items. The suit was brought by former president of NYPI, Raviner Syal (Syal), claiming that he took advantage of his access to NYPI’s recipes, suppliers, and other internal documents. In doing so, NYPI claimed that Syal has created a similar restaurant chain, Gina’s Italian Kitchen (Gina’s), which includes items on its menu that mimic the flavor and uniqueness of NYPI’s cuisine.

Secondary Liability for Trademark Infringement On Various Media

Originally posted 2014-03-03 21:38:44. By Sindy Wenjin Ding | amdlawgroup.com With buying power resting at the tips of our fingers, tech savvy and not so tech savvy fashion addicts are able to pursue the internet for all of their fashion fixes. Direct purchasing from the intellectual property owners becomes not so direct in this fast-changing […]

Be Aware of Google’s Copyright Infringement Policy Changes – International Intellectual Property Law – Case Study #10

Originally posted 2012-08-21 15:42:26. The search engine, Google has made some very interesting changes to its search algorithm aimed at deterring the use of sites that host copyright infringing content. This is a critical step in protecting valuable creative content on the internet. Google is now taking into account the number of valid copyright removal […]

Mobile Marketing: Proceed with Caution

By Christina Severino | amdlawgroup.com
In addition to the soaring popularity of social media, the advances in technology have lead many fashion and beauty brands to target consumers through mobile technology. Companies such as Target offer an SMS service in which they send coupons to customers on a regular basis, right to their mobile device.

Why Solopreneurs Need Trademark Protection

Why Solopreneurs Need Trademark Protection

Your trademark, like your name, is your identity, because, as a solopreneur, your business is yours and yours alone. And unlike your personal name, which you most probably did not choose, you worked and thought long and hard before you decided on your business trademark. You should have chosen a name that is unique, and that cannot be confused with the trademark of any other business, whether in a field similar to yours or those that have nothing at all to do with what you do. Now, you need to make sure that it is protected so that it belongs only to you, and so that when you decide to pursue other opportunities, you can even sell your trademark along with your other business assets.

4 Ways to Protect Your Trade Secrets Abroad

At the 25th session of the U.S.-China Joint Commission on Commerce and Trade (JCCT), intellectual property rights were emphasized with a focus on trade secrets. Trade secrets have been a core concern among foreign companies in China. Lack of enforcement has been attributed to things like China’s limited experience with trade secret cases and reluctance on the part of the local governments to take on complex cases because of the time and resources involved.

Brand Protection:  Why it is important?

Brand Protection: Why it is important?

For years I have been flooding my sphere of influence with information about brand protection: what it is and why it is important. Ideas become protectable brands. The reason that the concept resonates with me is that I have fallen prey to running my mouth about a great idea that came to me in one of my daily daydreams and watched someone else bring the concept to reality. Sure, they beat me to the “punch” and here I was left with very little recourse. This taught me a valuable lesson about protecting your valuable content FAST.

Tadashi: How Fashion Labels Gain Global Popularity

Tadashi Yani, who became the second richest man in Japan, founded the relatively new Japanese brand Uniqlo. There are more than 1,500 stores around the world; New York’s Fifth Avenue Uniqlo store encounters 6,000 customers daily and each customer buys an average of four items. How did Uniqlo’s fashion label rise to the top in such a short period of time? Many fashion companies focus on the high fashion runway trends and translate them into affordable versions, but Uniqlo takes it back to the basics. Uniqlo’s clothes are simple and practical. Although the company only has few styles to choose from, each style of clothing comes in over a hundred colors. Because Uniqlo’s products are not elaborate, buying fabric is cheaper—which allows the company to provide cheaper prices for its consumers. Uniqlo also has a team of textile masters who develop new high-tech fabrics for the brand. For example, Uniqlo developed a line of underwear using heat-regulating fabric with Toray industries, a Japanese chemical company.

Is the NFL’s Media Policy Absurd?

The Super Bowl is set to be played this Sunday, February 1, 2015, and while many are wrapped up in the deflate-gate controversy surrounding the New England Patriots following the AFC Championship Game against the Indianapolis Colts, some are still left scratching their heads concerning Marshawn Lynch’s presence (or lack thereof) in the media.

Luxury Beneath the Label: Protecting Your Brand at a Molecular Level with DNA Marking

By Christina Severino | amdlawgroup.com
The prevalence of counterfeit fashion has increasingly threatened the integrity and presence of luxury brands on a global stage. For every misspelled logo, clumsy stich or questionable cashmere sweater, profits collected from these counterfeits do more than fool the purchaser; they undermine the ingenuity of the original brand and potentially fund other criminal conduct that may go undiscovered.

Peter Fonda Brings Suit for ‘Easy Rider’ Shirts Against Dolce & Gabbana, Nordstrom

Italian luxury fashion designers Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana have been caught in a fresh legal bind, this time over their brand’s t-shirts sold by American fashion retailer Nordstrom, also a defendant. The shirts, which were priced at up to $295 apiece, have since been removed from sale on Nordstrom’s website. Actor Peter Fonda is suing for at least $6 million in compensation, claiming that the iconic images of himself in the classic 1969 film, “Easy Rider”, were used without his permission. Movie stills of Fonda on a motorcycle and the movie’s title in its original font are emblazoned on the t-shir