Court Date Set for Facebook Ad, Eminem Song Copyright Case

8 Mile Style, a song publisher for Eminem, filed a lawsuit in May against Facebook and Wieden & Kennedy, the advertising agency behind Facebook’s “Airplane” commercial for copyright infringement. The copyrighted song in question is “Under the Influence”, a collaboration piece between Eminem and rap group D12 off “The Marshall Mathers LP”, Eminem’s third and most successful studio album to date.

Twitter Changes its Copyright Policy

Twitter has made a significant change in its copyright policy, deciding to “withhold” tweets that receive a copyright complaint. The original tweet will be replaced with a message that reads, “This Tweet from @Username has been withheld in response to a report from the copyright holder.” The message also includes a link to Twitter’s “Copyright and Digital Millennium Copyright Act Policy” page.

What Designers Need to Know About Trademark, Patent and Copyright

Originally posted 2014-03-17 21:36:04. Sindy Wenjin Ding  |  www.amdlawgroup.com Some people confuse the differences among trademarks, patents and copyrights. It’s fundamental for intellectual property rights owners, especially fashion designers, to figure out the similarities and differences among these kinds of intellectual property protection, and the different purposes each serves. I’ll explain each kind one by […]

Updating Copyright from Tech’s Perspective

Online infringement may be hard to prevent, but even discerning real infringement from fake is also daunting. Google’s most recent report indicates over 15 million URLs have been subject to takedown requests, and the company says it takes down 97% of requests. Twitter has also been receiving an influx of takedown requests, with statistics showing a 76% increase over the 6-month period beginning this year January 1, though it takes down 61% of requests. Finally, the copyright case between giant media company Viacom and Youtube, a Google subsidiary, demonstrates how the DMCA has been used in courts; Viacom’s lawsuit against Youtube has failed twice already in the past 7 seven years. The main issue is proving Youtube’s actual knowledge of infringing

Robin Thicke Sues to Clear “Blurred Lines” from Copyright Claims

Robin Thicke Sues to Clear “Blurred Lines” from Copyright Claims

Robin Thicke and co-writers Pharrell Williams and Clifford Harris of this summer’s pop anthem, “Blurred Lines”, filed a lawsuit on August 15 in response to accusations by Marvin Gaye’s family and Bridgepoint Music, Inc. that the hit copies from Gaye’s 1977 single “Got to Give It Up” and Funkadelic’s 1974 song “Sexy Ways”. Bridgepoint Music owns some of the copyright for Funkadelic’s music. The Gayes and Bridgepoint have threatened to sue if the artists do not pay a monetary settlement, so Thicke, Williams and Harris are seeking declaratory relief from a Californian US District Court that would protect their from the defendants’ claims.

Trademark Squatting Gets Nowhere: Dsquared2 Won Back Its Legal Distributorship in China

Originally posted 2014-01-21 17:10:02. By Sindy Wenjin Ding | amdlawgroup.com A big periodic victory belongs to Dsquared2. This well-known fashion brand successfully secured its legal distributorship in China after experiencing a really hard time fighting for the legitimate sources for distribution of its products. The court in Hangzhou, in the decision, gave a green light […]

Kaught Red Handed: Kardashians Sued for Stolen Name

Originally posted 2013-03-18 17:06:40. By Kathleen Melhorn | amdlawgroup.com   After adding an H in “Kroma”, the Kardashians are facing a multi-million dollar lawsuit over their new line of beauty products. In fact, a judge ruled that all of the products be removed from over 5,000 retail stores because of the brand theft. The sisters are […]

Google and Policy Violation Checker

Google and Policy Violation Checker

Originally posted 2013-05-21 10:55:34. By Sohyeon Lee | amdlawgroup.com On 2 May 2013, Google filed a patent application for Policy Violation Checker— a system that detects problematic phrases in electronic documents. The purpose of this system is to prevent phrases that could potentially violate company policies or cause legal conflicts for businesses and individuals. In […]

Are You a Risky Fashionista…Or Are You Risking the Protection of Your Brand?

By Breanna Pendilton | amdlawgroup.com
I know what you’re thinking: “What exactly is a risky fashionista, and how do I know if I am one or not?” A risky fashionista is a person who is interested in a popular style or practice of fashion which may involve the possibility of having a bad or unpleasant reaction from others. In order to be a risky fashionista, you need exactly what the word says: risk and fashion. Without the risk, you’ll just have fashion; and while fashion is ok, it is not enough to protect your brand.

Doing the Most!: 50 Cent Expands Empire with New Disney Deal

Doing the Most!: 50 Cent Expands Empire with New Disney Deal

Curtis “50 cent” Jackson is the classic rags to riches tale. He grew up on the streets of Jamaica Queens, NY, where he was shot 9 times, and managed to survive the encounter. One could make an argument that the 39 year old rapper was destined to give the world something great. Not only has the mogul churned out one of the best-selling rap albums of all time with his debut “Get Rich or Die Tryin” in 2003, but he has also become a successful actor, and one of the most savvy business men in the music industry. In conjunction with his condom brand, entitled “Magic Stick”, and one of the most lucrative beverage deals in history with his “Formula 50” Vitamin Water, the multi-talented Jackson has now entered the audio industry with a new headphone deal with Intel, SMS Audio, and Disney.

Nestle Loses Battle to Trademark the “Kit-Kat” Design in the U.K.

Nestle Loses Battle to Trademark the “Kit-Kat” Design in the U.K.

The Advocate General of the Court of Justice of the European Union (EU) advised the European Court that Nestlé’s attempts to trademark the Kit Kat’s distinctive four-fingered shape does not comply with EU law. This opinion is likely to effectively end Nestlé’s attempts to trademark the shape of the candy as European Court judges usually follow the opinions of advocate generals.