Parody or Trademark Infringement? The Tale of Print T-Shirts

By Ozelle Martin | amdlawgroup.com
Lately, there seems to be a sudden burst in the number of print t-shirt lines that bear designs that are strikingly similar to those of well-known luxury brands such as Chanel, Gucci, Louis Vuitton, and Givenchy. Undoubtedly, these print t-shirt creators have ventured such a path, in an effort to appeal to the audiences of these very brands to whom they have become parasitic. With ammunition, in the form of potent legal departments, in tow- many of these brands are shooting off cease and desist letters like paintballs. Very often, their claim is that the printed t-shirt creators are infringing upon their marks. In response, the printed t-shirt creators raise their shields and assert that their inspired designs are mere parodies, a defense borrowed from copyright law’s fair use doctrine.

Court Date Set for Facebook Ad, Eminem Song Copyright Case

8 Mile Style, a song publisher for Eminem, filed a lawsuit in May against Facebook and Wieden & Kennedy, the advertising agency behind Facebook’s “Airplane” commercial for copyright infringement. The copyrighted song in question is “Under the Influence”, a collaboration piece between Eminem and rap group D12 off “The Marshall Mathers LP”, Eminem’s third and most successful studio album to date.

Prince Rocks The Courthouse: Copyright Protection

Pop music icon and recently deceased recording artist Prince was well known for his legendary songwriting, epic guitar skills, and flamboyant fashion style but also for his relentless pursuit of copyright infringement. In 2007, Prince declared war on The Pirate Bay, a torrent based online music sharing website, and filed a lawsuit which ultimately led to a $3.6 million verdict and even jail time for the website’s operators. Prince had received public backlash on numerous occasions for attempting to takedown fan websites that use his image and likeness.

Luxury Beneath the Label: Protecting Your Brand at a Molecular Level with DNA Marking

By Christina Severino | amdlawgroup.com
The prevalence of counterfeit fashion has increasingly threatened the integrity and presence of luxury brands on a global stage. For every misspelled logo, clumsy stich or questionable cashmere sweater, profits collected from these counterfeits do more than fool the purchaser; they undermine the ingenuity of the original brand and potentially fund other criminal conduct that may go undiscovered.

4 Ways to Protect Your Trade Secrets Abroad

At the 25th session of the U.S.-China Joint Commission on Commerce and Trade (JCCT), intellectual property rights were emphasized with a focus on trade secrets. Trade secrets have been a core concern among foreign companies in China. Lack of enforcement has been attributed to things like China’s limited experience with trade secret cases and reluctance on the part of the local governments to take on complex cases because of the time and resources involved.

“Hangouts” vs. “Hanginout”: Google’s Social Media App was Challenged by Trademark Infringement

Originally posted 2014-01-04 18:19:59. By Sindy Wenjin Ding | amdlawgroup.com Are you a user of “Hangouts” on your smartphone? Google is having trouble to keep using “Hangouts” as the name of its newly launched video-focused social media app. A California-based company, Hanginout, Inc. filed a lawsuit against Google, Inc. in late November 2013, claiming that […]

Unique is the New Black

By Diana Chan | amdlawgroup.com
In fashion, designs are continuously changing yet also seem to overlap among higher-end and lower-end brands. Designers should be wary when launching a design for their brand because of the risk that someone else may create a knockoff or variation of their original design. Because of this, designers must create something that is signature and innovative to the brand and that will to be protected under intellectual property laws.

First Step to Federally Protecting Your Copyright

Many people may confuse a trademark and a copyright. A trademark is generally a word, phrase, symbol or design or a combination thereof, that identifies and distinguishes the source of the goods of one party from those of others.On the other hand, a copyright is the limited period of exclusive rights to copy, license, or otherwise exploit fixed literary or artistic expression.

New Age of Fashion: Dutch Designer Meshes 3D Technology and Haute Couture

One of fashion’s newest trends is the utilization of 3D printing technology to produce custom made clothing, footwear, and jewelry. This is just one of the innovative ways that fashion designers have been changing the face of the fashion market. Martje Dijkstra, is a distinguishing Dutch fashion designer that incorporates 3D technology into her pieces in some groundbreaking ways.

AMD LAW × GREGORIO SANCHEZ AT 2016 NYFW

Originally posted 2015-09-24 11:20:41. By Sindy Ding-Voorhees, www.amdlawgroup.com We are proud of our fashion brand Client —— Gregorio Sanchez —— for successfully presenting his 2016 Spring/Summer collection at Mercedes Benz New York Fashion Week. This is the brand’s second time showcasing at New York Fashion Week. Both times were cooperated with the prestigious bi-coastal fashion […]

Ready to Expand to China? Don’t Wait to Register Your Brand

By Diana Chan | amdlawgroup.com
Because of the sheer number of people (and potential consumers), businesses are often drawn to the idea of expanding their brand and marketing their products in China. But businesses should be wary when taking their brand to China especially if they have not yet registered their trademark in China.

Protecting Your Brand: U.S. Customs and Border Patrol

By Diana Chan | amdlawgroup.com
Last summer, the United States Customs & Border Patrol (CBP) in Los Angeles, California, seized over 16,000 counterfeit Hermès handbags, valued at $295,665. If they were genuine Hermès handbags, the total retail price would have been nearly $211 million. In May of this year, CBP in Jersey City, New Jersey, intercepted 185 counterfeit guitars bearing trademarks such as Gibson, Les Paul, and Martin. The counterfeit guitars were being sold for $200 to $500, while the retail price of genuine models range from $2,000 to $54,000.