Gung Fu Scratch & the Avengers: Brand Positioning Done Well

Gung Fu Scratch & the Avengers: Brand Positioning Done Well

Avengers: Age of Ultron domestically grossed $191.3M dollars, and an impressive $631.1M internationally in its first week. Since, it has been reported by CNN the series earned $1B in just 24 days. These staggering numbers propel the Avengers franchise to adorn the number two spot, of top grossing series of all time. Age of Ultron did not disappoint. Tony Start was as witty and brilliant as ever, Bruce Banner was still attempting to come to terms with his “greener” side, and the villain in this particular installment gave the team an epic challenge.

It’s A Trademark… But It’s Not Actually a “Mark”

Trademark law has developed tremendously over time, thanks in huge part to the thriving field of technology. What was once a law dedicated generally to what people see, has now become a law dedicated also to what we hear. Just think about it. When you’re sitting on your couch at home watching TV and you hear, “Easy, Breezy, Beautiful”, you almost already know that this is a Cover Girl commercial. Or think about when you’re riding in your car listening to the radio, and you hear, “Ba Da Ba Ba Baaahhh, I’m Lovin’ It”, you automatically know that it’s a McDonald’s commercial. Increasingly, trademark law has not only come to protect words that you see as images, but words as you hear as slogans too.

Are You a Risky Fashionista…Or Are You Risking the Protection of Your Brand?

By Breanna Pendilton | amdlawgroup.com
I know what you’re thinking: “What exactly is a risky fashionista, and how do I know if I am one or not?” A risky fashionista is a person who is interested in a popular style or practice of fashion which may involve the possibility of having a bad or unpleasant reaction from others. In order to be a risky fashionista, you need exactly what the word says: risk and fashion. Without the risk, you’ll just have fashion; and while fashion is ok, it is not enough to protect your brand.

How to #Registeryourhashtag

By Ann Marie Sallusti | amdlawgroup.com
Hashtags are any word or words that have the pound (or hash) symbol in front of them. They are used to get certain words to trend on the Internet via twitter, instagram, Facebook and other social media networks. Anything can be a hashtag. For example, #mybrand, #awesome, #dolls, #trademark, and #fashion. Hashtags can be used to trigger discussions via twitter and other social media websites. A user can register their hashtag using the twubs website and track the use their hashtag receives from the Internet and social media networks. Hashtags can help get a user circulate his/her idea across the market. Additionally, hashtags can emphasize a point the user is trying to make about an event in the world or a personal experience.

Doing the Most!: 50 Cent Expands Empire with New Disney Deal

Doing the Most!: 50 Cent Expands Empire with New Disney Deal

Curtis “50 cent” Jackson is the classic rags to riches tale. He grew up on the streets of Jamaica Queens, NY, where he was shot 9 times, and managed to survive the encounter. One could make an argument that the 39 year old rapper was destined to give the world something great. Not only has the mogul churned out one of the best-selling rap albums of all time with his debut “Get Rich or Die Tryin” in 2003, but he has also become a successful actor, and one of the most savvy business men in the music industry. In conjunction with his condom brand, entitled “Magic Stick”, and one of the most lucrative beverage deals in history with his “Formula 50” Vitamin Water, the multi-talented Jackson has now entered the audio industry with a new headphone deal with Intel, SMS Audio, and Disney.

Brand Interaction: Take it from a Millennial

By Christina Severino | amdlawgroup.com
Although Baby Boomers still control roughly 70% the U.S.’s total disposable income, targeting “Gen Y” consumers is still a necessary evil for all brands. Generational gaps (both economically and socially) have turned the tables on brands, who are now struggling to keep up with the flighty and sometimes unpredictable behaviors of “Gen-Y”. A 2013 survey by Accenture.com claims that Millennials who use social media are 28% more likely to make a purchase because of a social media recommendation. It is not enough that they simply “like” the brand to make them loyal customers.

Michael Kors v. Costco: Bait-and-Switch Trademark Lawsuit

Michael Kors is reportedly seeking a court order to prevent further advertising of its items by Costco. Additionally, profits and punitive damages as a result of the contested ads are being sought. Costco does not sell Michael Kors bags either in retail stores or online, and the misleading pricing is a far cry from the high end prices seen on the Michael Kors website, ranging from $298 to $1195.

Licensing Your Fashion Brand

Whether a company is small or large, licensing can be beneficial in a multitude of ways. Not only can licensing bring about an increase of revenue, but also can expand a company’s outreach and establish a permanent, recognizable brand. Establishing a brand name is a valuable marketing strategy that distinguishes a company from the rest of its competitors.

Not Your Knot, Bottega Veneta’s Knot

The fashion brand, Bottega Veneta, well-known for its hand bangs and fragrances, had filed its unique “knot” design for trademark registration. Initially, the design was rejected by the USPTO because the knot was a non-distinctive product design and needed a secondary meaning. Bottega Veneta attempted to prove that its knot was distinctive through submitting its sales record, media coverage, high remarks from other fashion industry experts, and a comparison with other famous luxury brand marks.

Going Global: Don’t Get Lost in Translation

By Diana Chan | amdlawgroup.com
As businesses go global, catering to the local culture becomes an enormous factor in the success of the brand. Translations and images are often interpreted in different ways and what works in the United States may not be kindly accepted in another country. Even large corporations that spend millions of dollars on marketing have created failing campaigns from lack of research or minor mistakes.