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Branding

Tadashi: How Fashion Labels Gain Global Popularity

Tadashi Yani, who became the second richest man in Japan, founded the relatively new Japanese brand Uniqlo. There are more than 1,500 stores around the world; New York’s Fifth Avenue Uniqlo store encounters 6,000 customers daily and each customer buys an average of four items. How did Uniqlo’s fashion label rise to the top in such a short period of time? Many fashion companies focus on the high fashion runway trends and translate them into affordable versions, but Uniqlo takes it back to the basics. Uniqlo’s clothes are simple and practical. Although the company only has few styles to choose from, each style of clothing comes in over a hundred colors. Because Uniqlo’s products are not elaborate, buying fabric is cheaper—which allows the company to provide cheaper prices for its consumers. Uniqlo also has a team of textile masters who develop new high-tech fabrics for the brand. For example, Uniqlo developed a line of underwear using heat-regulating fabric with Toray industries, a Japanese chemical company.

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Rugby to Fashion

Tommy Bowe, an Ulster and Irish Lions rugby player, started a new gents brand clothing business called XV Kings Tommy Bowe Designs. He first involved himself in the fashion industry through collaboration with Lloyd & Pryce, a shoe brand.

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The Tale of Trademark Registration: What Can Tyler Perry Teach You?

By Ozelle Martin | amdlawgroup.com
Tyler Perry is a highly acclaimed film creator, screen and play writer, actor and now, a new trademark owner. Recently, he was involved in a blistering trademark battle, in the case of Tyler Perry Studios, LLC v. Kimberly Kearney. The featured actor in this tale of the trademark registration of “What Would Jesus Do?” was “use in commerce.”

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6 THINGS TO REMEMBER ABOUT BRAND PROTECTION AND SOCIAL MEDIA

Today’s expansion of social media websites has created a lot of new opportunities for companies to promote their brand, allowing for new forms of interactivity with countless customers simultaneously. At the same time, though, social networking websites like Facebook or Twitter also make it easier to lose control over one’s brand as anyone can create a Facebook or a Twitter account that contains the company’s brand name or engage in unauthorized uses of their trademark and the magnitude of information going through those websites is hardly easy to control. Here you can find some tips that will help in devising a safe and effective social media strategy without endangering your brand.

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Fashionable Google Glasses

An Italian eyewear luxury brand, Luxottica, announced their future partnership with Intel to create fashionable smart eyewear. Luxottica own many well known brands such like Ray-Ban, Oakley and Persol; the company also collaborates with Chanel, Prada, Giorgio Armani, Miu Miu, Tory Burch, and Stella McCartney. Intel and Luxottica plan to develop smart technology for eyewear designed and perceived to be worn in the future.

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Unique is the New Black

By Diana Chan | amdlawgroup.com
In fashion, designs are continuously changing yet also seem to overlap among higher-end and lower-end brands. Designers should be wary when launching a design for their brand because of the risk that someone else may create a knockoff or variation of their original design. Because of this, designers must create something that is signature and innovative to the brand and that will to be protected under intellectual property laws.

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It’s A Trademark… But It’s Not Actually a “Mark”

Trademark law has developed tremendously over time, thanks in huge part to the thriving field of technology. What was once a law dedicated generally to what people see, has now become a law dedicated also to what we hear. Just think about it. When you’re sitting on your couch at home watching TV and you hear, “Easy, Breezy, Beautiful”, you almost already know that this is a Cover Girl commercial. Or think about when you’re riding in your car listening to the radio, and you hear, “Ba Da Ba Ba Baaahhh, I’m Lovin’ It”, you automatically know that it’s a McDonald’s commercial. Increasingly, trademark law has not only come to protect words that you see as images, but words as you hear as slogans too.

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How to #Registeryourhashtag

By Ann Marie Sallusti | amdlawgroup.com
Hashtags are any word or words that have the pound (or hash) symbol in front of them. They are used to get certain words to trend on the Internet via twitter, instagram, Facebook and other social media networks. Anything can be a hashtag. For example, #mybrand, #awesome, #dolls, #trademark, and #fashion. Hashtags can be used to trigger discussions via twitter and other social media websites. A user can register their hashtag using the twubs website and track the use their hashtag receives from the Internet and social media networks. Hashtags can help get a user circulate his/her idea across the market. Additionally, hashtags can emphasize a point the user is trying to make about an event in the world or a personal experience.

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Doing Business in France

By Eliana Rocchi | amdlawgroup.com
Located in the heart of Europe and third in the world in attracting foreign direct investments, France could prove to be a strategically good choice for expanding your business.

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The Emerging Market of Revenge Porn

Imagine meeting the man or woman of your dreams. You are in bliss as the two of you undertake the journey to build a loving, and comfortable relationship. The relationship is a safe haven, a place of solace. It is so sacred that the two of you become romantically involved. You trust one another so much that harmless photos or videos are shared, and saved on each other’s mobile or media devices for future viewing. Then the unthinkable happens…a nasty break-up, someone hacks a cloud storage network, or a third party obtains the media and sells it for profit. You hear about your photo being posted on a revenge porn mogul website such as, Texxxan.com or Is Anybody Up.com. What remedies do you have? Will the legal system step in? Is the “injured party” entitled to relief?

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First Step to Federally Protecting Your Copyright

Many people may confuse a trademark and a copyright. A trademark is generally a word, phrase, symbol or design or a combination thereof, that identifies and distinguishes the source of the goods of one party from those of others.On the other hand, a copyright is the limited period of exclusive rights to copy, license, or otherwise exploit fixed literary or artistic expression.

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New Age of Fashion: Dutch Designer Meshes 3D Technology and Haute Couture

One of fashion’s newest trends is the utilization of 3D printing technology to produce custom made clothing, footwear, and jewelry. This is just one of the innovative ways that fashion designers have been changing the face of the fashion market. Martje Dijkstra, is a distinguishing Dutch fashion designer that incorporates 3D technology into her pieces in some groundbreaking ways.

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Gung Fu Scratch & the Avengers: Brand Positioning Done Well

Avengers: Age of Ultron domestically grossed $191.3M dollars, and an impressive $631.1M internationally in its first week. Since, it has been reported by CNN the series earned $1B in just 24 days. These staggering numbers propel the Avengers franchise to adorn the number two spot, of top grossing series of all time. Age of Ultron did not disappoint. Tony Start was as witty and brilliant as ever, Bruce Banner was still attempting to come to terms with his “greener” side, and the villain in this particular installment gave the team an epic challenge.

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Obvious Copying of an Iconic Design Yet Still an Uphill Battle

Owned by Nike since 2003, Converse’s Chuck Taylors have existed as a classic pair of shoes. Converse’s Chuck Taylor All Stars, commonly known as “Chucks,” are well-recognized by its classic rubber toe and sole and variety of colors. But over the years, look-a-likes from brands like Skechers, H&M, Fila, Ralph Lauren, Walmart, and several others have now led Converse to sue 31 companies for trademark infringement.

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