The Tale of Trademark Registration: What Can Tyler Perry Teach You?

By Ozelle Martin | amdlawgroup.com
Tyler Perry is a highly acclaimed film creator, screen and play writer, actor and now, a new trademark owner. Recently, he was involved in a blistering trademark battle, in the case of Tyler Perry Studios, LLC v. Kimberly Kearney. The featured actor in this tale of the trademark registration of “What Would Jesus Do?” was “use in commerce.”

Celebrity Fashion and Street Fashion: Brand Awareness for Luxury Brands

By Diana Chan | amdlawgroup.com
When it comes to celebrity fashion, people are wondering what brand celebrities are wearing especially at red carpet events like the Golden Globes or the Oscars. One of the reasons people are so drawn to watching these events are to see what celebrities are wearing. The first questions media outlets ask are related to what the celebrity is wearing. And the response is almost always a luxury, high-end designer. For emerging luxury designers, having their brand identified with a particular celebrity enhances their recognition and puts their brand in the spotlight, giving designers a chance to showcase their brand. Celebrity fashion also goes beyond red carpet events and focuses on what celebrities wear in their day-to-day lives. As social media closely follows celebrity trends, brand awareness can be magnified through photos of what celebrities are repeatedly wearing and comparisons among what trends celebrities are embracing.

All About Labels

By Ann Marie Sallusti | amdlawgroup.com
Some consumers are more interested in buying a product for the label or brand it represents rather than the functionality of the product. Regardless of the price, a consumer may be willing to spend more money to own a product with a well-known label, such as Starbucks, Louis Vuitton, Apple, and Ralph Lauren. There may be a cheaper product on the market, but the consumer will pay extra money to own and use a popular name brand. The consumer is essentially buying the product for its label. The label is important to some consumers to determine whether it will be a worthwhile purchase. In an article written by David Ning, he explains some helpful details to consider before splurging on a designer product. For example, he discusses the design value, the importance of the item to the consumer, and whether the product is classic or seasonal. A product can be “in style” for a particular length of time, where the product value eventually expires. On the other hand, classic products are timeless, where the product value never expires. The value of the product is often calculated by society views and the importance of the item to the consumer. Even though one consumer may believe a product is seasonal, the same product may be invaluable to another consumer.

Michael Kors… Or Michael Yours…and Hers…and His

By Breanna Pendilton | amdlawgroup.com
The Michael Kors brand is arguably one of the most expensive and well-known labels in today’s fashion world. But these same characteristics, (expensive and well-known) are exactly what’s destroying the reputation of this brand. Outlet stores and small business are jacking down the prices, and while the good ole’ Michael Kors’ stores still exist, customers are much more apt to buying them cheaper at other discount stores and retailers.

Fashionable Google Glasses

An Italian eyewear luxury brand, Luxottica, announced their future partnership with Intel to create fashionable smart eyewear. Luxottica own many well known brands such like Ray-Ban, Oakley and Persol; the company also collaborates with Chanel, Prada, Giorgio Armani, Miu Miu, Tory Burch, and Stella McCartney. Intel and Luxottica plan to develop smart technology for eyewear designed and perceived to be worn in the future.

What’s Harming the Fashion Industry

Why should a company protect its brand name? There is a multitude of reasons to register one’s trademark in the United States Patent and Trademark Office. One of the reasons is to stop others from copying your product and selling it as their own. To raise awareness of the harms the counterfeit market inflicts onto the fashion industry, New York City’s Fashion Institute of Technology opened a new exhibit “Faking It”.

The Brand Protection Woes of the Fashion Brand Zara: Chinese Trademark “Hijacking”

The Brand Protection Woes of the Fashion Brand Zara: Chinese Trademark “Hijacking”

News about Zara is all over the press lately. Zara’s founder, Amancio Ortega, recently surpassed Warren Buffet as the world’s second-richest man; several days later, the billionaire was also accused of being one of the most racist. Now, a $40 million discrimination lawsuit claiming he favors hiring employees who are “straight, Spanish and Christian”, has been filed against him. This lawsuit absolutely adds fuel to the flames for Zara, because remotely in China, Zara’s “backyard” is “on fire”.

Obvious Copying of an Iconic Design Yet Still an Uphill Battle

Owned by Nike since 2003, Converse’s Chuck Taylors have existed as a classic pair of shoes. Converse’s Chuck Taylor All Stars, commonly known as “Chucks,” are well-recognized by its classic rubber toe and sole and variety of colors. But over the years, look-a-likes from brands like Skechers, H&M, Fila, Ralph Lauren, Walmart, and several others have now led Converse to sue 31 companies for trademark infringement.

Piece by Piece: Showcasing the Craftsmanship of your Masterpiece

By Christina Severino | amdlawgroup.com
The process of launching a new line of products or an addition to an existing collection often involves centering a marketing campaign on the reputation or quality of the brand producing it. The status of a brand itself is oftentimes heavily relied upon during promotions if the brand already carries the prestige of a higher-tiered luxury brand. Recently, Marc Jacobs launched its campaign for the addition of the “Incognito” handbag to its line. Rather than focusing in on the brand’s name and reputation, Marc Jacobs decided to take the alternative angle of showing consumers the origin and process of crafting its handbags.