Tadashi: How Fashion Labels Gain Global Popularity

Tadashi Yani, who became the second richest man in Japan, founded the relatively new Japanese brand Uniqlo. There are more than 1,500 stores around the world; New York’s Fifth Avenue Uniqlo store encounters 6,000 customers daily and each customer buys an average of four items. How did Uniqlo’s fashion label rise to the top in such a short period of time? Many fashion companies focus on the high fashion runway trends and translate them into affordable versions, but Uniqlo takes it back to the basics. Uniqlo’s clothes are simple and practical. Although the company only has few styles to choose from, each style of clothing comes in over a hundred colors. Because Uniqlo’s products are not elaborate, buying fabric is cheaper—which allows the company to provide cheaper prices for its consumers. Uniqlo also has a team of textile masters who develop new high-tech fabrics for the brand. For example, Uniqlo developed a line of underwear using heat-regulating fabric with Toray industries, a Japanese chemical company.

European Court Protects Ralph Lauren “Polo Player” Trademark

The fashion brand, Ralph Lauren, well-known for its “Polo Player” logo recently won a trademark battle against FreshSide. Back In late 2009, FreshSide Ltd. applied to register a trademark with OHIM, the EU body responsible for Community Trademark registrations. FreshSide, which does business as “Chuck” applied to register a mark consisting of a polo player on a bicycle.

Unique is the New Black

By Diana Chan | amdlawgroup.com
In fashion, designs are continuously changing yet also seem to overlap among higher-end and lower-end brands. Designers should be wary when launching a design for their brand because of the risk that someone else may create a knockoff or variation of their original design. Because of this, designers must create something that is signature and innovative to the brand and that will to be protected under intellectual property laws.

Domain Names: Registration, Maintain and Monitor

Kathy Stewart | amdlawgroup.com

To introduce one to domain names and domain registration, one must begin with a basic understanding of the World Wide Web, in particular websites. Every computer on the Internet has an Internet protocol or IP address, which is a unique string of four numbers separated by periods, such as 165.166.0.2. Since remembering the IP address of Websites would be nearly impossible, a domain name system was created to replace the length of IP address thereby assigning a unique name to each numeric IP address. A domain name is therefore the unique name given to that particular website or IP address.

New European Cosmetics Regulation Streamlines Beauty Labeling

Besides unifying labeling practices across European member states, the Cosmetics Regulation also positively affects the integrity of beauty marketing and advertising, including the usage of “texts, names, trademarks, pictures and figurative or other signs” linked to the products. Such labels and representations of the product must meet the requirements of “legal compliance, truthfulness, support, honesty, fairness and informed decision making”.

6 THINGS TO REMEMBER ABOUT BRAND PROTECTION AND SOCIAL MEDIA

Today’s expansion of social media websites has created a lot of new opportunities for companies to promote their brand, allowing for new forms of interactivity with countless customers simultaneously. At the same time, though, social networking websites like Facebook or Twitter also make it easier to lose control over one’s brand as anyone can create a Facebook or a Twitter account that contains the company’s brand name or engage in unauthorized uses of their trademark and the magnitude of information going through those websites is hardly easy to control. Here you can find some tips that will help in devising a safe and effective social media strategy without endangering your brand.

TRADEMARK INFRINGEMENT versus PUBLIC DOMAIN

By Eliana Rocchi | amdlawgroup.com
The expression “Public domain” is generally used with reference to the works that belong to everyone and are available for public use. The concept comes from copyright law. It identifies those creative works that are not protected by copyright and thus may be used freely by the public. In other words anyone can copy them or modify them or generally use them in any way they wish.

Will Apple Watch Change the Demand for Wearable Technology?

After the much hyped keynote speech last week, Apple’s CEO, Tim Cook, introduced the Apple Watch. Companies like Google and FitBit have been trying to promote wearable technology by working together with fashion designers to create wearable technology that is fashionably appealing rather than appearing like a gadget. However, companies have struggled to get consumers to jump on the bandwagon. Will Apple be able to overcome this gap between of wearable technology and fashion?

First Step to Federally Protecting Your Copyright

Many people may confuse a trademark and a copyright. A trademark is generally a word, phrase, symbol or design or a combination thereof, that identifies and distinguishes the source of the goods of one party from those of others.On the other hand, a copyright is the limited period of exclusive rights to copy, license, or otherwise exploit fixed literary or artistic expression.

Why Retailers Like Nasty Gal And Forever 21 Get Away With Knockoffs

Why Retailers Like Nasty Gal And Forever 21 Get Away With Knockoffs

Originally posted 2015-06-08 11:56:44. (By Kelsey Laugel – www.amdlawgroup.com) At the 2015 Billboard Music Awards in May, Nasty Gal, an American-based retailer that specializes in providing more affordable versions of designer clothing, claimed credit for Taylor Swift’s white Balmain jumpsuit. For comparison, the average Balmain jumpsuit can cost anywhere from $2,000 to $6,000 while the […]