Protecting Your Manuscripts for Reality TV

By Diana Chan | amdlawgroup.com
Have you completed a manuscript for a reality tv show? In addition to federal copyright protection, Secure Script Registration with the Writer’s Guild of America can help writers protect their manuscripts associated with radio, film, and TV. Through the Writer’s Guild of America, authors protect their works by establishing legal evidence of the completion date of their original work and their prior claim to authorship–useful aspects against infringers.

Be Aware of Google’s Copyright Infringement Policy Changes – International Intellectual Property Law – Case Study #10

Originally posted 2012-08-21 15:42:26. The search engine, Google has made some very interesting changes to its search algorithm aimed at deterring the use of sites that host copyright infringing content. This is a critical step in protecting valuable creative content on the internet. Google is now taking into account the number of valid copyright removal […]

Why Solopreneurs Need Trademark Protection

Why Solopreneurs Need Trademark Protection

Your trademark, like your name, is your identity, because, as a solopreneur, your business is yours and yours alone. And unlike your personal name, which you most probably did not choose, you worked and thought long and hard before you decided on your business trademark. You should have chosen a name that is unique, and that cannot be confused with the trademark of any other business, whether in a field similar to yours or those that have nothing at all to do with what you do. Now, you need to make sure that it is protected so that it belongs only to you, and so that when you decide to pursue other opportunities, you can even sell your trademark along with your other business assets.

Brand Protection:  Why it is important?

Brand Protection: Why it is important?

For years I have been flooding my sphere of influence with information about brand protection: what it is and why it is important. Ideas become protectable brands. The reason that the concept resonates with me is that I have fallen prey to running my mouth about a great idea that came to me in one of my daily daydreams and watched someone else bring the concept to reality. Sure, they beat me to the “punch” and here I was left with very little recourse. This taught me a valuable lesson about protecting your valuable content FAST.

Are You Collaborating or Just Copying?

Let’s be honest! Some of the best music you’ve ever heard are music collaborations. It’s one of the best ways that you can make your work original, but it is also one of the most dangerous ways to have your work stripped from you (That is, if you do not adhere to the rules of copyright law). Before remixing, sampling, and/or collaborating on music, here are four things you should know.

Robin Thicke Sues to Clear “Blurred Lines” from Copyright Claims

Robin Thicke Sues to Clear “Blurred Lines” from Copyright Claims

Robin Thicke and co-writers Pharrell Williams and Clifford Harris of this summer’s pop anthem, “Blurred Lines”, filed a lawsuit on August 15 in response to accusations by Marvin Gaye’s family and Bridgepoint Music, Inc. that the hit copies from Gaye’s 1977 single “Got to Give It Up” and Funkadelic’s 1974 song “Sexy Ways”. Bridgepoint Music owns some of the copyright for Funkadelic’s music. The Gayes and Bridgepoint have threatened to sue if the artists do not pay a monetary settlement, so Thicke, Williams and Harris are seeking declaratory relief from a Californian US District Court that would protect their from the defendants’ claims.

You Can’t Have My Blessing…Or The Music!

By Breanna Pendilton | amdlawgroup.com
Copyright law is founded upon the theory that it will promote and incentivize new works, while also giving credit to the originator.  But what happens when the owner of that work, will not share it?  Does that promote and incentivize new works?  Lifetime has recently announced its plans to make a biopic of the late singer Aaliyah, who died tragically in a plane crash at the age of 22 in 2001.  Her family, who was not contacted about the biopic, is not happy, and feels as if Aaliyah’s life was enough of a story to be told on the big screen.  But what can they really do right?  I mean, Aaliyah’s life, itself, is nothing but a bunch of facts.  In the eyes of copyright law, facts are not copyrightable, and Aaliyah’s family does not own her life story.

Bunnies’ War

Bunnies’ War

Energizer Brands, LLC (“Energizer”) has been using its trademark (picture of a pink rabbit in sunglasses and with a drum) as of 1989. During the same year, the application for registration of the trademark was filed with USPTO. A year later, Duracell U.S. Operations, Inc. (“Duracell”) filed an application for its pink bunny trademark with USPTO as well.

The Not So iLife of Apple

With the entire hype surrounding apple, one would assume it was the only company to use the “i” before the name of the product it was selling. Unfortunately, this is not true in Brazil where Apple has been sued for using the term “iPhone”. Brazil is the largest Latin American country and Apple products are currently on the market there. However, other electronics companies are there as well.

SiriusXM Appeals Copyright Ruling

he U.S. District Court of Appeals for California ruled against SiriusXM last week for airing music produced prior to the 1972. The laws of federal copyrights after 1972 expanded to cover master recordings. The lawsuit was filed by band songwriters Flo & Eddie of the Turtles. They sought $100 million in damages from the satellite radio company.