You Can’t Have My Blessing…Or The Music!

By Breanna Pendilton | amdlawgroup.com
Copyright law is founded upon the theory that it will promote and incentivize new works, while also giving credit to the originator.  But what happens when the owner of that work, will not share it?  Does that promote and incentivize new works?  Lifetime has recently announced its plans to make a biopic of the late singer Aaliyah, who died tragically in a plane crash at the age of 22 in 2001.  Her family, who was not contacted about the biopic, is not happy, and feels as if Aaliyah’s life was enough of a story to be told on the big screen.  But what can they really do right?  I mean, Aaliyah’s life, itself, is nothing but a bunch of facts.  In the eyes of copyright law, facts are not copyrightable, and Aaliyah’s family does not own her life story.

Are You Collaborating or Just Copying?

Let’s be honest! Some of the best music you’ve ever heard are music collaborations. It’s one of the best ways that you can make your work original, but it is also one of the most dangerous ways to have your work stripped from you (That is, if you do not adhere to the rules of copyright law). Before remixing, sampling, and/or collaborating on music, here are four things you should know.

Kuwait Under Fire Over Copyright issues

Kuwait is now subject to heightened scrutiny from the US Trade Representative as the country failed to implement better standards to improve its intellectual property regulation. The United States on Monday raised Kuwait higher on the list of countries to watch regarding potential breach of US trademark, copyright and intellectual property rights.

The Battle Between Graffiti Artists and the High Culture of Fashion

Cavalli, an Italian fashion designer, used direct design by artists from the San Francisco Mission District in his 2014 Spring and Summer clothing line. Three graffiti artists, Jason Williams, Victor Chapa, and Jeffrey Rubin, filed a lawsuit against Cavalli “for copyright infringement, unfair competition, and violations of the Lanham Act (false designation claim of origin)”, stated Walsh.