Rihanna Comes Out on Top in Topshop T-shirt Lawsuit

The history of celebrities suing over the unauthorized use of their images on merchandise for the most part has not been a successful one despite the frequency of such occurrences (see the Peter Fonda, Dolce & Gabbana Easy Rider t-shirt case), so Rihanna’s won case may provide precedent for similar disputes in the future. However, her case has been analyzed and characterized as driven very much by the facts and specifics of its context. As the justice noted, there is “no such thing as a general right by a famous person to use control the reproduction of their image”, and besides, the image rights would have belonged to the photographer who took the photo.


By Eliana Rocchi | amdlawgroup.com
The expression “Public domain” is generally used with reference to the works that belong to everyone and are available for public use. The concept comes from copyright law. It identifies those creative works that are not protected by copyright and thus may be used freely by the public. In other words anyone can copy them or modify them or generally use them in any way they wish.

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When is a cheerleading uniform a uniform? If you have seen one cheerleading uniform or bought one for your little girl you have seen them all. In Varsity v. Star Athletica, LLC (Plaintiffs Varsity Brands, Inc., Varsity Spirit Corporation, and Varsity Spirit Fashions & Supplies, Inc. (collectively “Varsity”)) “have registered copyrights for multiple graphic designs […]

Kuwait Under Fire Over Copyright issues

Kuwait is now subject to heightened scrutiny from the US Trade Representative as the country failed to implement better standards to improve its intellectual property regulation. The United States on Monday raised Kuwait higher on the list of countries to watch regarding potential breach of US trademark, copyright and intellectual property rights.

The Battle Between Graffiti Artists and the High Culture of Fashion

Cavalli, an Italian fashion designer, used direct design by artists from the San Francisco Mission District in his 2014 Spring and Summer clothing line. Three graffiti artists, Jason Williams, Victor Chapa, and Jeffrey Rubin, filed a lawsuit against Cavalli “for copyright infringement, unfair competition, and violations of the Lanham Act (false designation claim of origin)”, stated Walsh.