Let’s Hash It Out: The Legal Protection of Your Hashtags #SoCool

A hashtag is any word or words that have the pound (or hash) symbol in front of them. They are used to get certain words to trend on the Internet via Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and other social media platforms. Anything can be a hashtag. For example, #mybrand, #awesome, #dolls, #trademark, and #fashion. You may be familiar with the recent controversy of Kris Jenner wanting to federally register the hashtag “#proudmama”- reportedly for advertising purposes. Hashtags are important and useful as they trigger discussions via twitter and other social media platforms.

Fashion Law: What Threatens Your Brand Value & What Causes the Invasion of Online Piracies? (2)

Originally posted 2014-01-16 16:35:46. By Sindy Wenjin Ding | amdlawgroup.com             2.    What Causes the Invasion             First of all, as cyberspace/public domain has become an open gateway, there are no boundaries on geography, time, buyers, identity of sellers, etc., in this invisible cyberspace market. The […]

Michael Kors… Or Michael Yours…and Hers…and His

By Breanna Pendilton | amdlawgroup.com
The Michael Kors brand is arguably one of the most expensive and well-known labels in today’s fashion world. But these same characteristics, (expensive and well-known) are exactly what’s destroying the reputation of this brand. Outlet stores and small business are jacking down the prices, and while the good ole’ Michael Kors’ stores still exist, customers are much more apt to buying them cheaper at other discount stores and retailers.

Twitter Law & Ethics, Kim Kardashian Style

By Kathleen Melhorn | amdlawgroup.com
10,000 dollars is an awful lot of money to get for composing a 140 character tweet. Class A Celebrity Kim Kardashian is reported to receive this amount from companies who need marketing for their products. Kim is not the only one who has been caught tweeting for cash, other stars like 50 Cent & Snoop Dogg do it as well. What are the ethics involved with tweeting for money? Is this practice considered unethical, or is it just a good idea for companies?

Tory Burch Sues over Counterfeit Jewelry, Gets Countersued

In a year rife with counterfeit lawsuits filed by Tory Burch to protect her famous TT logo, the designer brand is now faced with a suit itself as the defendant, a New York company Lin & J, recently struck back with a countersuit. Lin & J own a wholesale brand called Isis that sells rings, necklaces, and earrings Tory Burch asserts are counterfeits of the brand’s own jewelry. However, Lin & J deny that the Isis jewelry pieces are copies and that similarities are coincidental. In their counterclaim, Lin & J accuse Tory Burch of copying their design instead. Besides trademark infringement, they are suing the fashion brand for unfair trade practices, tortious interference with its business relationships and defamation.

Getting Out of the Weeds: Why Cannabis Products Can Be Patented but not Trademarked

Cannabis is legal for recreational or medicinal use in almost 30 states, and this number is likely to grow. However, cannabis remains illegal under federal law. As a result, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) will not register trademarks for retailers of cannabis, or for products that contain cannabis.
However, what is especially interesting is that the USPTO will grant patents involving cannabis and its derivatives. More simply put, cannabis is patentable. Examples of cannabis-related patents include drug formulations, methods of treating sickness and disease with cannabis, and even cannabis plant patents. So why is cannabis patentable, even though federally it is illegal?

Selling Counterfeits Online? Think Twice

In 2005, LVMH, a conglomerate that owns Louis Vuitton, Céline, Marc Jacobs, Möet & Chandon, Dom Pérignon, and several other luxury brands, brought an action in French court against Google for trademark infringement. Now, after a 10-year legal dispute, LVMH and Google have come to a settlement agreement and have decided to join together to fight the advertising and promotion of counterfeit products.


Applying and receiving a trademark is a daunting task and requires time and precision to ensure you do not face litigation for trademark infringement and other problems in the future.  Understanding the basic requirements of what to look for when you are considering applying for a trademark, and what the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) looks for is critical from the beginning.

Mobile Marketing: Proceed with Caution

By Christina Severino | amdlawgroup.com
In addition to the soaring popularity of social media, the advances in technology have lead many fashion and beauty brands to target consumers through mobile technology. Companies such as Target offer an SMS service in which they send coupons to customers on a regular basis, right to their mobile device.


Sometimes patenting an invention to protect how it is made or the way it works doesn’t cut it. Sometimes a lot of resources have been funneled into creating a unique aesthetical appearance for the final product, for the packaging it will come with, or both. Consider the Coca-Cola bottle, for example, it certainly is unique and distinctive and it immediately brings the drink to mind.

The Battle of Trademark Squatters In China

Originally posted 2014-04-16 17:10:31. By Sereine Brudent  |  amdlawgroup.com May 1, 2014 will mark a new frontier of Trademark Law in the People’s Republic of China. This third amendment seeks to address and define numerous areas of Trademark Law in order to circumvent trademark infringement. Previously, trademark rights were granted on a “first-to-file” principal, which […]

China Making Strides to Establish Specialized Court for Intellectual Property

China is taking strides to establish specialized courts to handle intellectual property cases. Over the next two weeks, China plans to set up its first specialized court in Beijing, and by the end of the year, intellectual property courts will be set up in Shanghai and Southern Guangzhou. China has been criticized for its lack of enforcement of intellectual property rights, but in recent years, it has made several developments to its intellectual property laws.

Reinventing the Pizza Won’t Get You Trademark Protection

Last week, Judge Costa of the Southern District Court of Texas (Galveston Division) ruled against New York Pizzeria, Inc. (NYPI) on its claims for damages regarding infringement of its flavors and plating methods of its menu items. The suit was brought by former president of NYPI, Raviner Syal (Syal), claiming that he took advantage of his access to NYPI’s recipes, suppliers, and other internal documents. In doing so, NYPI claimed that Syal has created a similar restaurant chain, Gina’s Italian Kitchen (Gina’s), which includes items on its menu that mimic the flavor and uniqueness of NYPI’s cuisine.