Road to the ITC is paved with Patent Trolls

Part of the International Trade Commission (ITC)’s job is to protect U.S. industry by monitoring foreign imports. The ITC can prevent goods from entering the country—including for infringement of IP. And it can issue only one remedy for infringements—an injunction. No money, just exclusion orders that stop violators in their tracks. And this is exactly why legitimate businesses and questionable businesses alike have raced down the road to the ITC.

What does that have to do with money-grubbing patent trolls?

4 Ways to Protect Your Trade Secrets Abroad

At the 25th session of the U.S.-China Joint Commission on Commerce and Trade (JCCT), intellectual property rights were emphasized with a focus on trade secrets. Trade secrets have been a core concern among foreign companies in China. Lack of enforcement has been attributed to things like China’s limited experience with trade secret cases and reluctance on the part of the local governments to take on complex cases because of the time and resources involved.

P.E.A. and MGM Fighting Over Eastwood Films

P.E.A. Films, Inc. is seeking to terminate MGM’s (Metro-Goldwyn-Meyer) contracts which granted licensing rights for three films headlined by Clint Eastwood (“The Good, the Bad and the Ugly” and “For a Few Dollars More”) and Marlon Brando (Last Tango). The films at issue were all produced by P.E.A.’s legendary Alberto Grimaldi. P.E.A. has filed its complaint in New York federal court against MGM, seeking damages starting at $5 million.

Elton John’s Copyright Woes – International Intellectual Property Law – Case Study #9

Music legend Elton John is filing his legal documents to dismiss a copyright infringement suit filed in Illinois back in April by singer/songwriter Guy Hobbs. Hobbs alleges that the composer lyricist team of Elton Hohn and Bernie Taupin stole lyrics from his 1983 title “Natasha” for their title “Nikita” released two years later.

“Hangouts” vs. “Hanginout”: Google’s Social Media App was Challenged by Trademark Infringement

Originally posted 2014-01-04 18:19:59. By Sindy Wenjin Ding | amdlawgroup.com Are you a user of “Hangouts” on your smartphone? Google is having trouble to keep using “Hangouts” as the name of its newly launched video-focused social media app. A California-based company, Hanginout, Inc. filed a lawsuit against Google, Inc. in late November 2013, claiming that […]

Unique is the New Black

By Diana Chan | amdlawgroup.com
In fashion, designs are continuously changing yet also seem to overlap among higher-end and lower-end brands. Designers should be wary when launching a design for their brand because of the risk that someone else may create a knockoff or variation of their original design. Because of this, designers must create something that is signature and innovative to the brand and that will to be protected under intellectual property laws.

First Step to Federally Protecting Your Copyright

Many people may confuse a trademark and a copyright. A trademark is generally a word, phrase, symbol or design or a combination thereof, that identifies and distinguishes the source of the goods of one party from those of others.On the other hand, a copyright is the limited period of exclusive rights to copy, license, or otherwise exploit fixed literary or artistic expression.

The Secret is Out!

By Breanna Pendilton | amdlawgroup.com
As mentioned in a previous blog, British luxury shirt retailer Thomas Pink filed an infringement action about a year ago against Victoria’s Secret with a court in London, alleging that the Victoria’s Secret PINK line confuses customers by marketing and selling products under the label “PINK” which is also a name under the Thomas Pink brand. Well, the verdict (or should I say “the secret”) is out! Judge Colin Birss ruled against Victoria Secrets saying that customers in Europe might associate the traditional shirt maker with underwear. But is it not this difference (the distinction between shirts and underwear), which should warrant the opposite verdict?

New Age of Fashion: Dutch Designer Meshes 3D Technology and Haute Couture

One of fashion’s newest trends is the utilization of 3D printing technology to produce custom made clothing, footwear, and jewelry. This is just one of the innovative ways that fashion designers have been changing the face of the fashion market. Martje Dijkstra, is a distinguishing Dutch fashion designer that incorporates 3D technology into her pieces in some groundbreaking ways.

AMD LAW × GREGORIO SANCHEZ AT 2016 NYFW

Originally posted 2015-09-24 11:20:41. By Sindy Ding-Voorhees, www.amdlawgroup.com We are proud of our fashion brand Client —— Gregorio Sanchez —— for successfully presenting his 2016 Spring/Summer collection at Mercedes Benz New York Fashion Week. This is the brand’s second time showcasing at New York Fashion Week. Both times were cooperated with the prestigious bi-coastal fashion […]

Ready to Expand to China? Don’t Wait to Register Your Brand

By Diana Chan | amdlawgroup.com
Because of the sheer number of people (and potential consumers), businesses are often drawn to the idea of expanding their brand and marketing their products in China. But businesses should be wary when taking their brand to China especially if they have not yet registered their trademark in China.

HOW TO PROTECT YOUR DESIGN AS A TRADEMARK

Sometimes patenting an invention to protect how it is made or the way it works doesn’t cut it. Sometimes a lot of resources have been funneled into creating a unique aesthetical appearance for the final product, for the packaging it will come with, or both. Consider the Coca-Cola bottle, for example, it certainly is unique and distinctive and it immediately brings the drink to mind.