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international business

What’s Harming the Fashion Industry

Why should a company protect its brand name? There is a multitude of reasons to register one’s trademark in the United States Patent and Trademark Office. One of the reasons is to stop others from copying your product and selling it as their own. To raise awareness of the harms the counterfeit market inflicts onto the fashion industry, New York City’s Fashion Institute of Technology opened a new exhibit “Faking It”.

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Tariffs and International Business Law – Case Study #2

Originally posted 2012-08-02 19:36:01. Tariffs have been a touchy issue in global economics for hundreds of years. Simply, tariffs are taxes on imported goods. If the United States taxed coffee beans coming in from Colombia, that tax would be a tariff. They are mainly a device to protect domestic industries so as to encourage companies […]

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Twitter Law & Ethics, Kim Kardashian Style

By Kathleen Melhorn | amdlawgroup.com
10,000 dollars is an awful lot of money to get for composing a 140 character tweet. Class A Celebrity Kim Kardashian is reported to receive this amount from companies who need marketing for their products. Kim is not the only one who has been caught tweeting for cash, other stars like 50 Cent & Snoop Dogg do it as well. What are the ethics involved with tweeting for money? Is this practice considered unethical, or is it just a good idea for companies?

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Getting Out of the Weeds: Why Cannabis Products Can Be Patented but not Trademarked

Cannabis is legal for recreational or medicinal use in almost 30 states, and this number is likely to grow. However, cannabis remains illegal under federal law. As a result, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) will not register trademarks for retailers of cannabis, or for products that contain cannabis.
However, what is especially interesting is that the USPTO will grant patents involving cannabis and its derivatives. More simply put, cannabis is patentable. Examples of cannabis-related patents include drug formulations, methods of treating sickness and disease with cannabis, and even cannabis plant patents. So why is cannabis patentable, even though federally it is illegal?

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Adidas Shares Jump on Report of Bid for Reebok

The shares of the German sportswear have jumped after the after the Wall Street Journal reported that an investor group that includes Jynwel Capital and funds affiliated with the Abu Dhabi government planned a $2.2 billion bid to buy Reebok.

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What You Need to Know About Tariffs and International Trade

By Eliana Rocchi | amdlawgroup.com
Tariffs have been a touchy issue in global economics for hundreds of years. Simply, tariffs are taxes on imported goods. If the United States taxed coffee beans coming in from Colombia, that tax would be a tariff. They are mainly a device to protect domestic industries so as to encourage companies to purchase goods between each other, helping the national economy grow without giving any business to foreign enterprises.

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Tadashi: How Fashion Labels Gain Global Popularity

Tadashi Yani, who became the second richest man in Japan, founded the relatively new Japanese brand Uniqlo. There are more than 1,500 stores around the world; New York’s Fifth Avenue Uniqlo store encounters 6,000 customers daily and each customer buys an average of four items. How did Uniqlo’s fashion label rise to the top in such a short period of time? Many fashion companies focus on the high fashion runway trends and translate them into affordable versions, but Uniqlo takes it back to the basics. Uniqlo’s clothes are simple and practical. Although the company only has few styles to choose from, each style of clothing comes in over a hundred colors. Because Uniqlo’s products are not elaborate, buying fabric is cheaper—which allows the company to provide cheaper prices for its consumers. Uniqlo also has a team of textile masters who develop new high-tech fabrics for the brand. For example, Uniqlo developed a line of underwear using heat-regulating fabric with Toray industries, a Japanese chemical company.

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Tips for Marketing Your Fashion Business in China – International Business Law – Case Study #4

An example of a trademark would be the “swoosh” logo that we identify with Nike. The swoosh, “Just do it,” and the name itself, “Nike,” are all trademarked phrases or images that belong to the Nike Corporation. When we see the swoosh logo, hear “Just do it,” or see the word “Nike,” we immediately are reminded of the style of their shoes, their comfort, and the lifestyle that we expect to be offered from the organization. Because these images and phrases inspire such brand awareness and loyalty, they are very coveted. To ensure that Nike is the only organization that can make use of and profit from their logos and slogans, they have them trademarked. Trademarks are words, phrases, symbols or designs that identify and distinguish the source of the goods of one party from those of others.

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An Important Question to Ask When Providing Sight to One Billion People

So you have come up with a great invention that can help not only millions but billions of the worlds poor see. How are you able to keep costs down while scaling up on production?

This is the question professor Josh Silver is grasping the answer to. Back in 1985, when discussing with a colleague about the possibility of producing glasses, that can be adjusted without the need for the expensive machinery or the obstetrician altogether. This conversation sparked Mr. Silver’s quest to help the poor of the world see.

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The Secret of the Born Global Firm

By Eliana Rocchi | amdlawgroup.com
What is a born global firm? Think of Skype, Google, Logitech, etc. A born global firm is “a business organization that, from inception, seeks to derive significant competitive advantage from the use of resources and the sale of outputs in multiple countries.”

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McDonald’s Brings a Super Sized Objection to Supermac’s Trademark Registration Attempts

Contrary to popular belief, it is not always the big companies that win intellectual property lawsuits. Even with excessive amounts of money at their disposal and employees to rigorously seek out potential infringement on their behalf, the big chains of the world sometimes lose to the little guy. In fact, this is exactly what happened in a fairly recent case in which McDonald’s sued McCurry, a restaurant in Malaysia that serves Indian food, and seems to be the direction a more recent case is headed in which McDonald’s is suing Supermac’s.

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Billionaire Richard Branson and Copyright – International Intellectual Property Law – Case Study #8

A copyright is a right to prevent others from using your originally authored work. To protect their creative ingenuity, as well as to ensure that they are the only ones who can make use of and profit from their material, authors of artistic or intellectual works have their material copyrighted. Those who have copyrighted material have many exclusive rights, such as the right to reproduce the work, distribute copies to the public for sale, and perform the work. Since anything you create can be copyrighted, copyrights can protect endless types of creative work. Some examples are recorded music, books, software codes, video games, paintings, plays, or sculptures.

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People must LIKE to sue Facebook

For the umpteenth time, Facebook is facing copyright infringement charges this week. After a Dutch family realized Facebook had very similar features to the invention made by their deceased kin, a lawsuit was issued. A Dutch programmer by the name of Jos Van Der Meer made a program that was much like a “social diary” and linked content from third party sites. He was also granted a patent for this feature in 1998, long before Facebook was even thought about. Facebook’s “like” button has this same feature allowing users to like different companies and/or products in the advertising bar on the side of the site.

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