International Business Law – Case Study #1

“KDBM Publishing” (a fictitous name) is a publishing firm based in the United States that is looking to expand its business overseas. Searching for a new country to do business in, various problems arose as to deciding where to expand towards. Some countries had different labor and environmental standards, while others had higher printing costs. These are common issues that arise while doing business globally. However, there are legal mechanisms that work at making doing business abroad more copacetic and uniform.

Kaught Red Handed: Kardashians Sued for Stolen Name

Originally posted 2013-03-18 17:06:40. By Kathleen Melhorn |   After adding an H in “Kroma”, the Kardashians are facing a multi-million dollar lawsuit over their new line of beauty products. In fact, a judge ruled that all of the products be removed from over 5,000 retail stores because of the brand theft. The sisters are […]

Apple Gets Baked With Lawsuit…Again

Originally posted 2013-03-18 17:08:48. By Kathleen Melhorn|   A popular audio company by the name of THX is filing a lawsuit against the multinational electronics corporation for creating a speaker that has already been patented. THX created what they call the “Slot Speaker” back in the early 2000’s, and proceeded to patent the unique […]

Nestle Loses Battle to Trademark the “Kit-Kat” Design in the U.K.

Nestle Loses Battle to Trademark the “Kit-Kat” Design in the U.K.

The Advocate General of the Court of Justice of the European Union (EU) advised the European Court that Nestlé’s attempts to trademark the Kit Kat’s distinctive four-fingered shape does not comply with EU law. This opinion is likely to effectively end Nestlé’s attempts to trademark the shape of the candy as European Court judges usually follow the opinions of advocate generals.

Global Protection for All ~ Everywhere

Intellectual property is a vital necessity for the success of any product or company. Whether protection in trademark, patent, copyright, or trade secret, individuals or corporations need to ensure that their branding and unique designs will not be diluted by counterfeiters or copycats. The fashion industry especially has struggled with the issue of intellectual property as the Court views clothing as more for functional purposes than a distinguished product. Changes in the U.S. patent law provide great opportunity for fashion designers to protect their designs not only in the United States, but also all over the world.

Apple doesn’t make the same mistake twice (Kathleen Melhorn, Staff Writer)

Instead of facing infringement charges or risking winding up in court again, Apple filed seven trademarks this week. The patents Apple filed would protect the application icons in the new iPod Nano device coming out soon. A website called “Patently Apple” which focuses solely around Apple’s inventions, breaks down the entire file for the trademarks. Viewers are able to see all details down to the colors that they would like to own for the application icons.

What is the definition of a “Born Global” firm? International Business Law – Case Study #2

The definition of a born global firm is “a business organization that, from inception, seeks to derive significant competitive advantage from the use of resources and the sale of outputs in multiple countries.” Many companies go global, but that does not make them born global firms. What distinguishes born global firms from the rest of international organizations is that they originate internationally. Born global firms, from their beginnings, have a global focus and commit their resources to international ventures. Most companies operate from their home country, and after years of doing business domestically, slowly evolve to do business internationally. By contrast, born global firms begin with a borderless world view, and immediately develop strategies to expand themselves abroad. Born global firms have many distinctive features that allow them to start, and thrive in the international arena.

International Takedown Request not Working – International Intellectual Property Law – Case Study #4

A report from the UK’s IP Crime Group says that the British Recorded Music Industry has found and removed 4,298,729 illegally hosted digital music files back in 2011. The group also removed 61,232 illegally hosted digital music files in the UK alone. The Publishers Association has so far issued over 200,000 takedown notices to over 5,200 infringing domains with about a 90% removal success rate (Peoples).