New Age of Fashion: Dutch Designer Meshes 3D Technology and Haute Couture

One of fashion’s newest trends is the utilization of 3D printing technology to produce custom made clothing, footwear, and jewelry. This is just one of the innovative ways that fashion designers have been changing the face of the fashion market. Martje Dijkstra, is a distinguishing Dutch fashion designer that incorporates 3D technology into her pieces in some groundbreaking ways.

Amazon’s Loss to Lush

Lush is a beauty brand that produces products from fresh organic fruit and vegetables. Their products such as makeup, soap, and face wash are not animal tested and are made fresh by hand with little or no preservative. Lush brand chose not to sell their products on Amazon but when customers searched “lush” into the search bar, similar beauty products sold by Lush appeared in the results.

Peter Fonda Brings Suit for ‘Easy Rider’ Shirts Against Dolce & Gabbana, Nordstrom

Italian luxury fashion designers Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana have been caught in a fresh legal bind, this time over their brand’s t-shirts sold by American fashion retailer Nordstrom, also a defendant. The shirts, which were priced at up to $295 apiece, have since been removed from sale on Nordstrom’s website. Actor Peter Fonda is suing for at least $6 million in compensation, claiming that the iconic images of himself in the classic 1969 film, “Easy Rider”, were used without his permission. Movie stills of Fonda on a motorcycle and the movie’s title in its original font are emblazoned on the t-shir

My Smell is Unique

Kimiya Shams argues that intellectual property law should protect fragrances. Competition between fragrance companies, mainly in Europe, is on the rise. In 2012, the global fragrance market was valued at $28 billion dollars and companies spend around 7 to 12 percent of their revenues from perfume sales in research alone. If a brand sells the most popular fragrance, its revenue can easily exceed one billion dollars per year.

Robin Thicke Sues to Clear “Blurred Lines” from Copyright Claims

Robin Thicke Sues to Clear “Blurred Lines” from Copyright Claims

Robin Thicke and co-writers Pharrell Williams and Clifford Harris of this summer’s pop anthem, “Blurred Lines”, filed a lawsuit on August 15 in response to accusations by Marvin Gaye’s family and Bridgepoint Music, Inc. that the hit copies from Gaye’s 1977 single “Got to Give It Up” and Funkadelic’s 1974 song “Sexy Ways”. Bridgepoint Music owns some of the copyright for Funkadelic’s music. The Gayes and Bridgepoint have threatened to sue if the artists do not pay a monetary settlement, so Thicke, Williams and Harris are seeking declaratory relief from a Californian US District Court that would protect their from the defendants’ claims.

NCAA Parts Ways with Video Game Maker Electronic Arts Amidst Lawsuit

What started out as a group of ex-college athletes looking to win monetary compensation from the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), which has been profiting from sports video games and media broadcasts using athletes’ names, images and likenesses in their production, may soon culminate in a class action lawsuit that would change the game of

Pandora’s Licensing Rights Won’t be Yanked

A 2013 decision by New York federal judge Louis Stanton has prompted digital media outlets, namely Pandora Radio, to seek advice how to proceed if their licensing rights were to be taken. Judge Stanton ruled that if major music publishers decide to withdraw performance licenses, they must withdraw fully, not just partially to avoid online digital streaming companies.

Inventors: Samantha Jagger

Inspiration for UPheels was a combination of things, like ruining shoes at outdoor weddings in the grass; sinking in the grass altogether; a friend suffering a spiral fracture to her ankle when her heel caught in some decking; ruining shoes just walking to work, (when the heels snapped off in the cracks of the pavement). One day Jagger was setting up for a work function which involved assembling what felt like millions of disposable champagne flutes with attachable foot bases. That was when she realized that if she had a base that was big enough and strong enough, it could fit onto the bottom of a stiletto.

Michael Kors v. Costco: Bait-and-Switch Trademark Lawsuit

Michael Kors is reportedly seeking a court order to prevent further advertising of its items by Costco. Additionally, profits and punitive damages as a result of the contested ads are being sought. Costco does not sell Michael Kors bags either in retail stores or online, and the misleading pricing is a far cry from the high end prices seen on the Michael Kors website, ranging from $298 to $1195.

Not Your Knot, Bottega Veneta’s Knot

The fashion brand, Bottega Veneta, well-known for its hand bangs and fragrances, had filed its unique “knot” design for trademark registration. Initially, the design was rejected by the USPTO because the knot was a non-distinctive product design and needed a secondary meaning. Bottega Veneta attempted to prove that its knot was distinctive through submitting its sales record, media coverage, high remarks from other fashion industry experts, and a comparison with other famous luxury brand marks.

[The Forefront of Fashion Law] On-the-spot Report of 4th Annual Fashion Law Symposium

Originally posted 2014-04-22 18:33:30. By Sindy Wenjin Ding | amdlawgroup.com The Fashion Law Institute’s 4th Annual Symposium entitled “The spectrum of Style” was held in Fordham Law School in New York on Apr 4. I attended the symposium as a Fashion Law practitioner at AMD LAW, as well as a Fordham Law alumna. The Symposium […]

New Trend in Infringement Litigation: Section 337

The U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC) adjudicates claims of unfair competition involving imported articles under Section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930 (codified as 19 U.S.C §1337). While most Section 337 investigations are intellectual property (IP)-related matters dealing with high tech products, recently, Section 337 has been used for fashion-related IP.

Tory Burch Sues over Counterfeit Jewelry, Gets Countersued

In a year rife with counterfeit lawsuits filed by Tory Burch to protect her famous TT logo, the designer brand is now faced with a suit itself as the defendant, a New York company Lin & J, recently struck back with a countersuit. Lin & J own a wholesale brand called Isis that sells rings, necklaces, and earrings Tory Burch asserts are counterfeits of the brand’s own jewelry. However, Lin & J deny that the Isis jewelry pieces are copies and that similarities are coincidental. In their counterclaim, Lin & J accuse Tory Burch of copying their design instead. Besides trademark infringement, they are suing the fashion brand for unfair trade practices, tortious interference with its business relationships and defamation.

All About Labels

By Ann Marie Sallusti | amdlawgroup.com
Some consumers are more interested in buying a product for the label or brand it represents rather than the functionality of the product. Regardless of the price, a consumer may be willing to spend more money to own a product with a well-known label, such as Starbucks, Louis Vuitton, Apple, and Ralph Lauren. There may be a cheaper product on the market, but the consumer will pay extra money to own and use a popular name brand. The consumer is essentially buying the product for its label. The label is important to some consumers to determine whether it will be a worthwhile purchase. In an article written by David Ning, he explains some helpful details to consider before splurging on a designer product. For example, he discusses the design value, the importance of the item to the consumer, and whether the product is classic or seasonal. A product can be “in style” for a particular length of time, where the product value eventually expires. On the other hand, classic products are timeless, where the product value never expires. The value of the product is often calculated by society views and the importance of the item to the consumer. Even though one consumer may believe a product is seasonal, the same product may be invaluable to another consumer.