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Music

Trump’s Copyright Battle with Queen

With GOP nominee Donald Trump’s recent antics and remarks, it does not come as a shock that Queen is less than pleased and trying to fight back against Trump’s use of the band’s famous hit “We Are the Champions.”

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Do You Hear the Sweet Sound of Copyright Protection for your Melodies?

Copyright exists the moment something is put in a tangible form.  It is an exclusive legal right, a form of protection provided by the laws of the United States for “original works of authorship”, including literary, dramatic, musical, architectural, cartographic, choreographic, pantomimic, pictorial, graphic, sculptural, and audiovisual creations. The length of time that a work is protected by copyright for a work first published after January 1, 1978, is the life of the author plus 70 years. 

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Getting a Trademark for a “Controversial” Name

Originally posted 2013-03-20 18:04:34. By Tasha Schmidt | amdlawgroup.com It is important to trademark your name, especially when it is your band’s name, and this is exactly what this Asian rock group is attempting to do. Except the rock group is trying to trademark the name, “The Slants.” The band tried to trademark the name […]

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An Unknown Privacy Infringement?

Originally posted 2013-02-27 18:26:52. Tasha Schmidt, Staff Writer, AMD Law Have you downloaded an app for Google Play? Well next time you do, you will probably think twice before doing it. In addition to the malicious software that somehow wiggled its way into the store, it was revealed that Google collects users personal data. Not […]

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Are You Collaborating or Just Copying?

Let’s be honest! Some of the best music you’ve ever heard are music collaborations. It’s one of the best ways that you can make your work original, but it is also one of the most dangerous ways to have your work stripped from you (That is, if you do not adhere to the rules of copyright law). Before remixing, sampling, and/or collaborating on music, here are four things you should know.

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Robin Thicke Sues to Clear “Blurred Lines” from Copyright Claims

Robin Thicke and co-writers Pharrell Williams and Clifford Harris of this summer’s pop anthem, “Blurred Lines”, filed a lawsuit on August 15 in response to accusations by Marvin Gaye’s family and Bridgepoint Music, Inc. that the hit copies from Gaye’s 1977 single “Got to Give It Up” and Funkadelic’s 1974 song “Sexy Ways”. Bridgepoint Music owns some of the copyright for Funkadelic’s music. The Gayes and Bridgepoint have threatened to sue if the artists do not pay a monetary settlement, so Thicke, Williams and Harris are seeking declaratory relief from a Californian US District Court that would protect their from the defendants’ claims.

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You Can’t Have My Blessing…Or The Music!

By Breanna Pendilton | amdlawgroup.com
Copyright law is founded upon the theory that it will promote and incentivize new works, while also giving credit to the originator.  But what happens when the owner of that work, will not share it?  Does that promote and incentivize new works?  Lifetime has recently announced its plans to make a biopic of the late singer Aaliyah, who died tragically in a plane crash at the age of 22 in 2001.  Her family, who was not contacted about the biopic, is not happy, and feels as if Aaliyah’s life was enough of a story to be told on the big screen.  But what can they really do right?  I mean, Aaliyah’s life, itself, is nothing but a bunch of facts.  In the eyes of copyright law, facts are not copyrightable, and Aaliyah’s family does not own her life story.

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SiriusXM Appeals Copyright Ruling

he U.S. District Court of Appeals for California ruled against SiriusXM last week for airing music produced prior to the 1972. The laws of federal copyrights after 1972 expanded to cover master recordings. The lawsuit was filed by band songwriters Flo & Eddie of the Turtles. They sought $100 million in damages from the satellite radio company.

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Apple Gets Baked With Lawsuit…Again

Originally posted 2013-03-18 17:08:48. By Kathleen Melhorn| amdlawgroup.com   A popular audio company by the name of THX is filing a lawsuit against the multinational electronics corporation for creating a speaker that has already been patented. THX created what they call the “Slot Speaker” back in the early 2000’s, and proceeded to patent the unique […]

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Taylor Tries To Trademark Tracks

Taylor Alison Swift, world renowned country music and pop sensation, is no stranger to the world of intellectual property. In recent years she has been sued for Trademark Infringement of Her Brand Lucky 13, she has created, and obtained, copyrights in chart topping albums, and pulled her music off media streaming giant Spotify. Taylor is at it again. She has recently filed for trademark rights of her works “This Sick Beat”, “Party Like It’s 1989”, amongst others. Taylor has not been granted any of these trademarks, as of yet, by the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

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Hey, DJ Keep Playin’ That Song… Unless You Didn’t Pay For It!

By Breanna Pendilton | amdlawgroup.com
Hey, DJ
“Mic check, 1..2..1..2!” With the summer time here and the fall vastly approaching, we find ourselves in the season of parties: wedding parties, graduation parties, and soon, back-to-school parties. And with parties, come people, music, and DJs. While these three things are normal for every party, these three things can also put you at risk for violation of a federal copyright law. (Ask yourself, “Is the roof really on fire?’)

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Pandora’s Licensing Rights Won’t be Yanked

A 2013 decision by New York federal judge Louis Stanton has prompted digital media outlets, namely Pandora Radio, to seek advice how to proceed if their licensing rights were to be taken. Judge Stanton ruled that if major music publishers decide to withdraw performance licenses, they must withdraw fully, not just partially to avoid online digital streaming companies.

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