My Name and My Trademark… Yep, It’s the Same Thing!

Over the past two years, the United States Patent and Trademark Office, has granted British singer and songwriter, Rita Ora, federal protection over the use of the mark “Rita Ora”. That’s right, her name is now registered as a valid trade and service mark for concert souvenirs, clothes, hair and makeup accessories, music recordings, and even her performances and/or services as a singer and songwriter.

First Step to Federally Protecting Your Trademark

By Ann Marie Sallusti | amdlawgroup.com
Trademarks are not just a mark on a product. Trademarks make products identifiable to consumers and are essentially the product that is being sold. Trademarks “may” be federally registered with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), but registration is not mandatory in the United States. Unlike most countries, the United States follows the first to use rule when protecting trademark rights. The first to use rule protects the trademark rights of the first party who uses the trademark of a certain product or service in commerce. Therefore, if a creator satisfies the requirement of using the trademark in commerce in the United States, the creator’s work will be protected. On the other hand, most other countries follow the first to file rule when protecting trademark rights, which protects the trademark rights of the first party to file an application and receive registration for a certain product or service.

Beware of Nicknames and Trademarks

You might think that you are just using an innocent nickname but on the other hand maybe you are not. Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel teamed up with JMAN2 Enterprises LLC in December during football season to trademark, “Johnny Football.” However, neither the company nor Manziel cannot proceed to make money until he is out of the NCAA.

Tips for Marketing Your Fashion Business in China – International Business Law – Case Study #4

An example of a trademark would be the “swoosh” logo that we identify with Nike. The swoosh, “Just do it,” and the name itself, “Nike,” are all trademarked phrases or images that belong to the Nike Corporation. When we see the swoosh logo, hear “Just do it,” or see the word “Nike,” we immediately are reminded of the style of their shoes, their comfort, and the lifestyle that we expect to be offered from the organization. Because these images and phrases inspire such brand awareness and loyalty, they are very coveted. To ensure that Nike is the only organization that can make use of and profit from their logos and slogans, they have them trademarked. Trademarks are words, phrases, symbols or designs that identify and distinguish the source of the goods of one party from those of others.

It’s A Trademark… But It’s Not Actually a “Mark”

Trademark law has developed tremendously over time, thanks in huge part to the thriving field of technology. What was once a law dedicated generally to what people see, has now become a law dedicated also to what we hear. Just think about it. When you’re sitting on your couch at home watching TV and you hear, “Easy, Breezy, Beautiful”, you almost already know that this is a Cover Girl commercial. Or think about when you’re riding in your car listening to the radio, and you hear, “Ba Da Ba Ba Baaahhh, I’m Lovin’ It”, you automatically know that it’s a McDonald’s commercial. Increasingly, trademark law has not only come to protect words that you see as images, but words as you hear as slogans too.

Why the ALS Withdrew its Trademark Application

By Chloe Coska | amdlawgroup.com
Everyone is aware of the Ice Bucket Challenge these days. The meme has gone viral on the internet and throughout the world. From celebrities to the girl next door, everybody has been doing the challenge in order to raise awareness to fight amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a disease affecting the brain and spinal cord. The campaign so far has raised $94 million in less than a month.

The Trademark Tacking Doctrine: What is it and Who Should Decide.

In trademark law, the tacking doctrine allows an existing trademark owner to modify its mark without abandoning ownership of the original trademark. The key to allowing the modification without abandonment or loss of priority is continuity. In other words, the mark must retain a common element that symbolizes a continuing commercial impression.

My Smell is Unique

Kimiya Shams argues that intellectual property law should protect fragrances. Competition between fragrance companies, mainly in Europe, is on the rise. In 2012, the global fragrance market was valued at $28 billion dollars and companies spend around 7 to 12 percent of their revenues from perfume sales in research alone. If a brand sells the most popular fragrance, its revenue can easily exceed one billion dollars per year.

Secondary Liability for Trademark Infringement On Various Media

Originally posted 2014-03-03 21:38:44. By Sindy Wenjin Ding | amdlawgroup.com With buying power resting at the tips of our fingers, tech savvy and not so tech savvy fashion addicts are able to pursue the internet for all of their fashion fixes. Direct purchasing from the intellectual property owners becomes not so direct in this fast-changing […]

Fight OVER Evil: The Yankees Win A Lawsuit

Originally posted 2013-02-25 14:50:17. The Yankee’s successfully took an intended insult and created something great when they adapted to the title “Baseball’s Evil Empire”. When Red Sox CEO Larry Lucchino threw the phrase at the team in 2002, he probably did not predict that it would help them win a lawsuit.             With the help […]