Staples vs. Shoplet – What do you think? – International Intellectual Property Law- Case Study #18

Originally posted 2012-09-08 14:11:44. The largest office supply retailer, Staples, is suing a much smaller rival, Shoplet.com, for trademark infringement, claiming that Shoplet’s logo and website too closely resembles its own. To understand the market domination Staples has over Shoplet, Staples is the nation’s No.1 office supply retailer and the No.2 internet retailer, while Shoplet […]

Brand Protection:  Why it is important?

Brand Protection: Why it is important?

For years I have been flooding my sphere of influence with information about brand protection: what it is and why it is important. Ideas become protectable brands. The reason that the concept resonates with me is that I have fallen prey to running my mouth about a great idea that came to me in one of my daily daydreams and watched someone else bring the concept to reality. Sure, they beat me to the “punch” and here I was left with very little recourse. This taught me a valuable lesson about protecting your valuable content FAST.

International Intellectual Property – Case Study #1

Imagine a publishing firm based in the United States called “KDBM Publishing” (a fictitious company). At PJD, they specialize in novels of fictions, and children’s books. To protect the creative ingenuity of their authors, PJD has copyrighted all of their works. However, copyright laws in foreign countries work differently than those in the United States. For example, in Canada, the dissemination of digital files is legal as long as the distributor is not making a profit. In the United States however, this is as known as piracy, and is illegal. If a citizen of Canada had digital files of PJD Publishing’s works and decided to distribute them for free, although this would legal in Canada, they would be in violation of The United States copyright law. Creating a consistent legal framework internationally are the efforts of international intellectual property law. In achieving this, intellectual property owners do business internationally while being protected by global intellectual property standards.

Obvious Copying of an Iconic Design Yet Still an Uphill Battle

Owned by Nike since 2003, Converse’s Chuck Taylors have existed as a classic pair of shoes. Converse’s Chuck Taylor All Stars, commonly known as “Chucks,” are well-recognized by its classic rubber toe and sole and variety of colors. But over the years, look-a-likes from brands like Skechers, H&M, Fila, Ralph Lauren, Walmart, and several others have now led Converse to sue 31 companies for trademark infringement.

Nestle Loses Battle to Trademark the “Kit-Kat” Design in the U.K.

Nestle Loses Battle to Trademark the “Kit-Kat” Design in the U.K.

The Advocate General of the Court of Justice of the European Union (EU) advised the European Court that Nestlé’s attempts to trademark the Kit Kat’s distinctive four-fingered shape does not comply with EU law. This opinion is likely to effectively end Nestlé’s attempts to trademark the shape of the candy as European Court judges usually follow the opinions of advocate generals.

Protecting Your Brand: From the Factory to the Stores

By Breanna Pendilton | amdlawgroup.com
It is important as a designer that you protect the image and reputation of your brand. In other words, you want the product that is hanging in the stores to be the product that you produced in the factory; nothing less and nothing more. This seems to be a common problem with “off the rack” designers. Even though you can no longer monitor the day to day whereabouts of your designs after it leaves your supervision, you still have rights which may help protect your brand in the future.

John Wayne Family Loses Round One to Duke University in Trademark Fight

As a fan of the great John Wayne you should be aware that he was referred as “Duke,” “Duke Morrison,” “Duke Wayne,” “Duke and The Duke” — a nickname that derived from his boyhood dog named Duke. John Wayne Enterprises, a Newport Beach Corporation filed a trademark application back in 2013 for the marks “Duke” and “Duke John Wayne” for alcoholic beverages excluding beers.

Secondary Liability for Trademark Infringement On Various Media

Originally posted 2014-03-03 21:38:44. By Sindy Wenjin Ding | amdlawgroup.com With buying power resting at the tips of our fingers, tech savvy and not so tech savvy fashion addicts are able to pursue the internet for all of their fashion fixes. Direct purchasing from the intellectual property owners becomes not so direct in this fast-changing […]

Licensing Your Fashion Brand

Whether a company is small or large, licensing can be beneficial in a multitude of ways. Not only can licensing bring about an increase of revenue, but also can expand a company’s outreach and establish a permanent, recognizable brand. Establishing a brand name is a valuable marketing strategy that distinguishes a company from the rest of its competitors.

European Court Protects Ralph Lauren “Polo Player” Trademark

The fashion brand, Ralph Lauren, well-known for its “Polo Player” logo recently won a trademark battle against FreshSide. Back In late 2009, FreshSide Ltd. applied to register a trademark with OHIM, the EU body responsible for Community Trademark registrations. FreshSide, which does business as “Chuck” applied to register a mark consisting of a polo player on a bicycle.