Let’s Hash It Out: The Legal Protection of Your Hashtags #SoCool

A hashtag is any word or words that have the pound (or hash) symbol in front of them. They are used to get certain words to trend on the Internet via Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and other social media platforms. Anything can be a hashtag. For example, #mybrand, #awesome, #dolls, #trademark, and #fashion. You may be familiar with the recent controversy of Kris Jenner wanting to federally register the hashtag “#proudmama”- reportedly for advertising purposes. Hashtags are important and useful as they trigger discussions via twitter and other social media platforms.

Michael Kors… Or Michael Yours…and Hers…and His

By Breanna Pendilton | amdlawgroup.com
The Michael Kors brand is arguably one of the most expensive and well-known labels in today’s fashion world. But these same characteristics, (expensive and well-known) are exactly what’s destroying the reputation of this brand. Outlet stores and small business are jacking down the prices, and while the good ole’ Michael Kors’ stores still exist, customers are much more apt to buying them cheaper at other discount stores and retailers.

Getting Out of the Weeds: Why Cannabis Products Can Be Patented but not Trademarked

Cannabis is legal for recreational or medicinal use in almost 30 states, and this number is likely to grow. However, cannabis remains illegal under federal law. As a result, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) will not register trademarks for retailers of cannabis, or for products that contain cannabis.
However, what is especially interesting is that the USPTO will grant patents involving cannabis and its derivatives. More simply put, cannabis is patentable. Examples of cannabis-related patents include drug formulations, methods of treating sickness and disease with cannabis, and even cannabis plant patents. So why is cannabis patentable, even though federally it is illegal?


Applying and receiving a trademark is a daunting task and requires time and precision to ensure you do not face litigation for trademark infringement and other problems in the future.  Understanding the basic requirements of what to look for when you are considering applying for a trademark, and what the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) looks for is critical from the beginning.


Sometimes patenting an invention to protect how it is made or the way it works doesn’t cut it. Sometimes a lot of resources have been funneled into creating a unique aesthetical appearance for the final product, for the packaging it will come with, or both. Consider the Coca-Cola bottle, for example, it certainly is unique and distinctive and it immediately brings the drink to mind.

The Battle of Trademark Squatters In China

Originally posted 2014-04-16 17:10:31. By Sereine Brudent  |  amdlawgroup.com May 1, 2014 will mark a new frontier of Trademark Law in the People’s Republic of China. This third amendment seeks to address and define numerous areas of Trademark Law in order to circumvent trademark infringement. Previously, trademark rights were granted on a “first-to-file” principal, which […]

Reinventing the Pizza Won’t Get You Trademark Protection

Last week, Judge Costa of the Southern District Court of Texas (Galveston Division) ruled against New York Pizzeria, Inc. (NYPI) on its claims for damages regarding infringement of its flavors and plating methods of its menu items. The suit was brought by former president of NYPI, Raviner Syal (Syal), claiming that he took advantage of his access to NYPI’s recipes, suppliers, and other internal documents. In doing so, NYPI claimed that Syal has created a similar restaurant chain, Gina’s Italian Kitchen (Gina’s), which includes items on its menu that mimic the flavor and uniqueness of NYPI’s cuisine.

Secondary Liability for Trademark Infringement On Various Media

Originally posted 2014-03-03 21:38:44. By Sindy Wenjin Ding | amdlawgroup.com With buying power resting at the tips of our fingers, tech savvy and not so tech savvy fashion addicts are able to pursue the internet for all of their fashion fixes. Direct purchasing from the intellectual property owners becomes not so direct in this fast-changing […]

Why the ALS Withdrew its Trademark Application

By Chloe Coska | amdlawgroup.com
Everyone is aware of the Ice Bucket Challenge these days. The meme has gone viral on the internet and throughout the world. From celebrities to the girl next door, everybody has been doing the challenge in order to raise awareness to fight amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a disease affecting the brain and spinal cord. The campaign so far has raised $94 million in less than a month.

Not Your Knot, Bottega Veneta’s Knot

The fashion brand, Bottega Veneta, well-known for its hand bangs and fragrances, had filed its unique “knot” design for trademark registration. Initially, the design was rejected by the USPTO because the knot was a non-distinctive product design and needed a secondary meaning. Bottega Veneta attempted to prove that its knot was distinctive through submitting its sales record, media coverage, high remarks from other fashion industry experts, and a comparison with other famous luxury brand marks.

Getting a Trademark for a “Controversial” Name

Originally posted 2013-03-20 18:04:34. By Tasha Schmidt | amdlawgroup.com It is important to trademark your name, especially when it is your band’s name, and this is exactly what this Asian rock group is attempting to do. Except the rock group is trying to trademark the name, “The Slants.” The band tried to trademark the name […]

Why Solopreneurs Need Trademark Protection

Why Solopreneurs Need Trademark Protection

Your trademark, like your name, is your identity, because, as a solopreneur, your business is yours and yours alone. And unlike your personal name, which you most probably did not choose, you worked and thought long and hard before you decided on your business trademark. You should have chosen a name that is unique, and that cannot be confused with the trademark of any other business, whether in a field similar to yours or those that have nothing at all to do with what you do. Now, you need to make sure that it is protected so that it belongs only to you, and so that when you decide to pursue other opportunities, you can even sell your trademark along with your other business assets.

Brand Protection:  Why it is important?

Brand Protection: Why it is important?

For years I have been flooding my sphere of influence with information about brand protection: what it is and why it is important. Ideas become protectable brands. The reason that the concept resonates with me is that I have fallen prey to running my mouth about a great idea that came to me in one of my daily daydreams and watched someone else bring the concept to reality. Sure, they beat me to the “punch” and here I was left with very little recourse. This taught me a valuable lesson about protecting your valuable content FAST.