AMD LAW × GREGORIO SANCHEZ AT 2016 NYFW

Originally posted 2015-09-24 11:20:41. By Sindy Ding-Voorhees, www.amdlawgroup.com We are proud of our fashion brand Client —— Gregorio Sanchez —— for successfully presenting his 2016 Spring/Summer collection at Mercedes Benz New York Fashion Week. This is the brand’s second time showcasing at New York Fashion Week. Both times were cooperated with the prestigious bi-coastal fashion […]

Ready to Expand to China? Don’t Wait to Register Your Brand

By Diana Chan | amdlawgroup.com
Because of the sheer number of people (and potential consumers), businesses are often drawn to the idea of expanding their brand and marketing their products in China. But businesses should be wary when taking their brand to China especially if they have not yet registered their trademark in China.

HOW TO PROTECT YOUR DESIGN AS A TRADEMARK

Sometimes patenting an invention to protect how it is made or the way it works doesn’t cut it. Sometimes a lot of resources have been funneled into creating a unique aesthetical appearance for the final product, for the packaging it will come with, or both. Consider the Coca-Cola bottle, for example, it certainly is unique and distinctive and it immediately brings the drink to mind.

Fashion Law: What Threatens Your Brand Value & What Causes the Invasion of Online Piracies? (1)

Originally posted 2014-01-13 14:58:32. By Sindy Wenjin Ding | amdlawgroup.com             Although it has long been said the imitation may be the sincerest form of flattery, in fashion business, unauthorized “imitations” cost companies immeasurable sums in lost sales and damage to the reputation.[i] Most fashion companies don’t welcome, even fear this kind of flattering, when […]

How and when to protect your intellectual property in your small business

Bravo to all the small business owners that have the bravery, vision and drive to create something incredible and novel in the marketplace. Every business starts out from an idea. No matter where you are in the stage of solidifying your business idea or executing your business plan, intellectual property is a substantial part of the plan and you want to timely and correctly protect this valuable asset, especially as you try to get your endeavor off the ground by marketing and advertising your product or service.

My Name and My Trademark… Yep, It’s the Same Thing!

Over the past two years, the United States Patent and Trademark Office, has granted British singer and songwriter, Rita Ora, federal protection over the use of the mark “Rita Ora”. That’s right, her name is now registered as a valid trade and service mark for concert souvenirs, clothes, hair and makeup accessories, music recordings, and even her performances and/or services as a singer and songwriter.

First Step to Federally Protecting Your Trademark

By Ann Marie Sallusti | amdlawgroup.com
Trademarks are not just a mark on a product. Trademarks make products identifiable to consumers and are essentially the product that is being sold. Trademarks “may” be federally registered with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), but registration is not mandatory in the United States. Unlike most countries, the United States follows the first to use rule when protecting trademark rights. The first to use rule protects the trademark rights of the first party who uses the trademark of a certain product or service in commerce. Therefore, if a creator satisfies the requirement of using the trademark in commerce in the United States, the creator’s work will be protected. On the other hand, most other countries follow the first to file rule when protecting trademark rights, which protects the trademark rights of the first party to file an application and receive registration for a certain product or service.

Tips for Marketing Your Fashion Business in China – International Business Law – Case Study #4

An example of a trademark would be the “swoosh” logo that we identify with Nike. The swoosh, “Just do it,” and the name itself, “Nike,” are all trademarked phrases or images that belong to the Nike Corporation. When we see the swoosh logo, hear “Just do it,” or see the word “Nike,” we immediately are reminded of the style of their shoes, their comfort, and the lifestyle that we expect to be offered from the organization. Because these images and phrases inspire such brand awareness and loyalty, they are very coveted. To ensure that Nike is the only organization that can make use of and profit from their logos and slogans, they have them trademarked. Trademarks are words, phrases, symbols or designs that identify and distinguish the source of the goods of one party from those of others.

It’s A Trademark… But It’s Not Actually a “Mark”

Trademark law has developed tremendously over time, thanks in huge part to the thriving field of technology. What was once a law dedicated generally to what people see, has now become a law dedicated also to what we hear. Just think about it. When you’re sitting on your couch at home watching TV and you hear, “Easy, Breezy, Beautiful”, you almost already know that this is a Cover Girl commercial. Or think about when you’re riding in your car listening to the radio, and you hear, “Ba Da Ba Ba Baaahhh, I’m Lovin’ It”, you automatically know that it’s a McDonald’s commercial. Increasingly, trademark law has not only come to protect words that you see as images, but words as you hear as slogans too.

My Smell is Unique

Kimiya Shams argues that intellectual property law should protect fragrances. Competition between fragrance companies, mainly in Europe, is on the rise. In 2012, the global fragrance market was valued at $28 billion dollars and companies spend around 7 to 12 percent of their revenues from perfume sales in research alone. If a brand sells the most popular fragrance, its revenue can easily exceed one billion dollars per year.

Fight OVER Evil: The Yankees Win A Lawsuit

Originally posted 2013-02-25 14:50:17. The Yankee’s successfully took an intended insult and created something great when they adapted to the title “Baseball’s Evil Empire”. When Red Sox CEO Larry Lucchino threw the phrase at the team in 2002, he probably did not predict that it would help them win a lawsuit.             With the help […]