The Pink Store Prevails

A business owner in Elkorn, Nebraska recently won a trademark battle against Limited Brands giant Victoria’s Secret. Beka Doolittle, owner of the online business “The Pink Store” has been going up against Victoria’s Secret this past year over use of the word “pink”. One of the notable brands of Victoria’s Secret is it’s Pink line that caters to young women. Ms. Doolittle’s online business carries items for all ages and items for the home, all themed as (you guessed it) pink. After Victoria’s Secret submitted a petition to cancel her mark on the United State Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) , Ms. Doolittle enlisted help in order to fight back, and it paid off. Victoria’s Secret finally backed off and cancelled their petition, but with no clear reason.

Parody or Trademark Infringement? The Tale of Print T-Shirts

By Ozelle Martin | amdlawgroup.com
Lately, there seems to be a sudden burst in the number of print t-shirt lines that bear designs that are strikingly similar to those of well-known luxury brands such as Chanel, Gucci, Louis Vuitton, and Givenchy. Undoubtedly, these print t-shirt creators have ventured such a path, in an effort to appeal to the audiences of these very brands to whom they have become parasitic. With ammunition, in the form of potent legal departments, in tow- many of these brands are shooting off cease and desist letters like paintballs. Very often, their claim is that the printed t-shirt creators are infringing upon their marks. In response, the printed t-shirt creators raise their shields and assert that their inspired designs are mere parodies, a defense borrowed from copyright law’s fair use doctrine.

Amazon’s Loss to Lush

Lush is a beauty brand that produces products from fresh organic fruit and vegetables. Their products such as makeup, soap, and face wash are not animal tested and are made fresh by hand with little or no preservative. Lush brand chose not to sell their products on Amazon but when customers searched “lush” into the search bar, similar beauty products sold by Lush appeared in the results.

“Hangouts” vs. “Hanginout”: Google’s Social Media App was Challenged by Trademark Infringement

Originally posted 2014-01-04 18:19:59. By Sindy Wenjin Ding | amdlawgroup.com Are you a user of “Hangouts” on your smartphone? Google is having trouble to keep using “Hangouts” as the name of its newly launched video-focused social media app. A California-based company, Hanginout, Inc. filed a lawsuit against Google, Inc. in late November 2013, claiming that […]

The Secret is Out!

By Breanna Pendilton | amdlawgroup.com
As mentioned in a previous blog, British luxury shirt retailer Thomas Pink filed an infringement action about a year ago against Victoria’s Secret with a court in London, alleging that the Victoria’s Secret PINK line confuses customers by marketing and selling products under the label “PINK” which is also a name under the Thomas Pink brand. Well, the verdict (or should I say “the secret”) is out! Judge Colin Birss ruled against Victoria Secrets saying that customers in Europe might associate the traditional shirt maker with underwear. But is it not this difference (the distinction between shirts and underwear), which should warrant the opposite verdict?

AMD LAW × GREGORIO SANCHEZ AT 2016 NYFW

Originally posted 2015-09-24 11:20:41. By Sindy Ding-Voorhees, www.amdlawgroup.com We are proud of our fashion brand Client —— Gregorio Sanchez —— for successfully presenting his 2016 Spring/Summer collection at Mercedes Benz New York Fashion Week. This is the brand’s second time showcasing at New York Fashion Week. Both times were cooperated with the prestigious bi-coastal fashion […]

Ready to Expand to China? Don’t Wait to Register Your Brand

By Diana Chan | amdlawgroup.com
Because of the sheer number of people (and potential consumers), businesses are often drawn to the idea of expanding their brand and marketing their products in China. But businesses should be wary when taking their brand to China especially if they have not yet registered their trademark in China.

HOW TO PROTECT YOUR DESIGN AS A TRADEMARK

Sometimes patenting an invention to protect how it is made or the way it works doesn’t cut it. Sometimes a lot of resources have been funneled into creating a unique aesthetical appearance for the final product, for the packaging it will come with, or both. Consider the Coca-Cola bottle, for example, it certainly is unique and distinctive and it immediately brings the drink to mind.

Fashion Law: What Threatens Your Brand Value & What Causes the Invasion of Online Piracies? (1)

Originally posted 2014-01-13 14:58:32. By Sindy Wenjin Ding | amdlawgroup.com             Although it has long been said the imitation may be the sincerest form of flattery, in fashion business, unauthorized “imitations” cost companies immeasurable sums in lost sales and damage to the reputation.[i] Most fashion companies don’t welcome, even fear this kind of flattering, when […]

How and when to protect your intellectual property in your small business

Bravo to all the small business owners that have the bravery, vision and drive to create something incredible and novel in the marketplace. Every business starts out from an idea. No matter where you are in the stage of solidifying your business idea or executing your business plan, intellectual property is a substantial part of the plan and you want to timely and correctly protect this valuable asset, especially as you try to get your endeavor off the ground by marketing and advertising your product or service.

My Name and My Trademark… Yep, It’s the Same Thing!

Over the past two years, the United States Patent and Trademark Office, has granted British singer and songwriter, Rita Ora, federal protection over the use of the mark “Rita Ora”. That’s right, her name is now registered as a valid trade and service mark for concert souvenirs, clothes, hair and makeup accessories, music recordings, and even her performances and/or services as a singer and songwriter.