The Tale of Trademark Registration: What Can Tyler Perry Teach You?

By Ozelle Martin | amdlawgroup.com
Tyler Perry is a highly acclaimed film creator, screen and play writer, actor and now, a new trademark owner. Recently, he was involved in a blistering trademark battle, in the case of Tyler Perry Studios, LLC v. Kimberly Kearney. The featured actor in this tale of the trademark registration of “What Would Jesus Do?” was “use in commerce.”

Peter Fonda Brings Suit for ‘Easy Rider’ Shirts Against Dolce & Gabbana, Nordstrom

Italian luxury fashion designers Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana have been caught in a fresh legal bind, this time over their brand’s t-shirts sold by American fashion retailer Nordstrom, also a defendant. The shirts, which were priced at up to $295 apiece, have since been removed from sale on Nordstrom’s website. Actor Peter Fonda is suing for at least $6 million in compensation, claiming that the iconic images of himself in the classic 1969 film, “Easy Rider”, were used without his permission. Movie stills of Fonda on a motorcycle and the movie’s title in its original font are emblazoned on the t-shir

Patent Troll Control

A study published by Boston University in 2012 found that over $29 billion of direct costs were generated by patent troll patent assertions. Further, it is estimated that these costs ballooned to over $80 billion, once the stock market reacts to such litigation. “Patent trolls,” or Non-practicing entities (NPEs), can be either a company or individual who essentially purchases patents, but has no intention to develop and market a product arising from that patent.

Selling Counterfeits Online? Think Twice

In 2005, LVMH, a conglomerate that owns Louis Vuitton, Céline, Marc Jacobs, Möet & Chandon, Dom Pérignon, and several other luxury brands, brought an action in French court against Google for trademark infringement. Now, after a 10-year legal dispute, LVMH and Google have come to a settlement agreement and have decided to join together to fight the advertising and promotion of counterfeit products.

Robin Thicke Sues to Clear “Blurred Lines” from Copyright Claims

Robin Thicke Sues to Clear “Blurred Lines” from Copyright Claims

Robin Thicke and co-writers Pharrell Williams and Clifford Harris of this summer’s pop anthem, “Blurred Lines”, filed a lawsuit on August 15 in response to accusations by Marvin Gaye’s family and Bridgepoint Music, Inc. that the hit copies from Gaye’s 1977 single “Got to Give It Up” and Funkadelic’s 1974 song “Sexy Ways”. Bridgepoint Music owns some of the copyright for Funkadelic’s music. The Gayes and Bridgepoint have threatened to sue if the artists do not pay a monetary settlement, so Thicke, Williams and Harris are seeking declaratory relief from a Californian US District Court that would protect their from the defendants’ claims.

An Important Question to Ask When Providing Sight to One Billion People

So you have come up with a great invention that can help not only millions but billions of the worlds poor see. How are you able to keep costs down while scaling up on production?

This is the question professor Josh Silver is grasping the answer to. Back in 1985, when discussing with a colleague about the possibility of producing glasses, that can be adjusted without the need for the expensive machinery or the obstetrician altogether. This conversation sparked Mr. Silver’s quest to help the poor of the world see.

You Can’t Have My Blessing…Or The Music!

By Breanna Pendilton | amdlawgroup.com
Copyright law is founded upon the theory that it will promote and incentivize new works, while also giving credit to the originator.  But what happens when the owner of that work, will not share it?  Does that promote and incentivize new works?  Lifetime has recently announced its plans to make a biopic of the late singer Aaliyah, who died tragically in a plane crash at the age of 22 in 2001.  Her family, who was not contacted about the biopic, is not happy, and feels as if Aaliyah’s life was enough of a story to be told on the big screen.  But what can they really do right?  I mean, Aaliyah’s life, itself, is nothing but a bunch of facts.  In the eyes of copyright law, facts are not copyrightable, and Aaliyah’s family does not own her life story.

Inventor Creates in Wife’s Memory

An inventor from Minnesota is using his loss of a loved one to drive his invention for “Easy Caulk.”

Greg Amundson along with his kids and wife June started to create his invention for “Easy Caulk.” They wanted to take the mess out of traditional caulk guns and provide a product from the USA. They also wanted it to be environmentally friendly.

Fashion Inspiration: Maya Angelou

Mercedes Joshua | amdlawgroup.com
Fashion inspiration can come from anyone, but the person I believe to really inspire fashion is Dr. Maya Angelou. She was one of the most renowned and influential voices of our time. She encouraged people and inspired them to be something more and, without realizing it, she also became a fashion icon. Because she was such a role model to young black women, they looked up to her in everything she did and what she wore. Dr. Angelou was a great poet, memoirist, novelist, educator, dramatist, producer, actress, historian, filmmaker, and civil rights activist. She also never conformed to social stereotypes when it came to clothes. She had a very classic and modern look all at the same time. She always looked so comfortable in whatever she was wearing. Her clothes truly expressed who she was, a classy woman.

First Step to Federally Protecting Your Trademark

By Ann Marie Sallusti | amdlawgroup.com
Trademarks are not just a mark on a product. Trademarks make products identifiable to consumers and are essentially the product that is being sold. Trademarks “may” be federally registered with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), but registration is not mandatory in the United States. Unlike most countries, the United States follows the first to use rule when protecting trademark rights. The first to use rule protects the trademark rights of the first party who uses the trademark of a certain product or service in commerce. Therefore, if a creator satisfies the requirement of using the trademark in commerce in the United States, the creator’s work will be protected. On the other hand, most other countries follow the first to file rule when protecting trademark rights, which protects the trademark rights of the first party to file an application and receive registration for a certain product or service.

6 THINGS TO REMEMBER ABOUT BRAND PROTECTION AND SOCIAL MEDIA

Today’s expansion of social media websites has created a lot of new opportunities for companies to promote their brand, allowing for new forms of interactivity with countless customers simultaneously. At the same time, though, social networking websites like Facebook or Twitter also make it easier to lose control over one’s brand as anyone can create a Facebook or a Twitter account that contains the company’s brand name or engage in unauthorized uses of their trademark and the magnitude of information going through those websites is hardly easy to control. Here you can find some tips that will help in devising a safe and effective social media strategy without endangering your brand.