Nestle Loses Battle to Trademark the “Kit-Kat” Design in the U.K.

Nestle Loses Battle to Trademark the “Kit-Kat” Design in the U.K.

The Advocate General of the Court of Justice of the European Union (EU) advised the European Court that Nestlé’s attempts to trademark the Kit Kat’s distinctive four-fingered shape does not comply with EU law. This opinion is likely to effectively end Nestlé’s attempts to trademark the shape of the candy as European Court judges usually follow the opinions of advocate generals.

Internet Service Providers and Copyright Infringement – International Intellectual Property Law – Case Study #6

An alliance known as the Center for Copyright Information has been formed between Internet Service Providers (ISP’s) and owners of copyrighted material to help inhibit copyright infringement on the internet. The partnership consists of Internet Service Providers AT&T, Cablevision, Comcast, Time Warner Cable, and Verizon, with the Motion Picture Association of America and the Recording Industry Association of America. The plan proposed by the coalition is unlike anything done in the past to stop piracy. It is entirely non punitive, and is aimed at education (Law Librarian Blog).

Protecting Your Brand: From the Factory to the Stores

By Breanna Pendilton | amdlawgroup.com
It is important as a designer that you protect the image and reputation of your brand. In other words, you want the product that is hanging in the stores to be the product that you produced in the factory; nothing less and nothing more. This seems to be a common problem with “off the rack” designers. Even though you can no longer monitor the day to day whereabouts of your designs after it leaves your supervision, you still have rights which may help protect your brand in the future.

Secondary Liability for Trademark Infringement On Various Media

Originally posted 2014-03-03 21:38:44. By Sindy Wenjin Ding | amdlawgroup.com With buying power resting at the tips of our fingers, tech savvy and not so tech savvy fashion addicts are able to pursue the internet for all of their fashion fixes. Direct purchasing from the intellectual property owners becomes not so direct in this fast-changing […]

Trademark Squatting Gets Nowhere: Dsquared2 Won Back Its Legal Distributorship in China

Originally posted 2014-01-21 17:10:02. By Sindy Wenjin Ding | amdlawgroup.com A big periodic victory belongs to Dsquared2. This well-known fashion brand successfully secured its legal distributorship in China after experiencing a really hard time fighting for the legitimate sources for distribution of its products. The court in Hangzhou, in the decision, gave a green light […]

China Making Strides to Establish Specialized Court for Intellectual Property

China is taking strides to establish specialized courts to handle intellectual property cases. Over the next two weeks, China plans to set up its first specialized court in Beijing, and by the end of the year, intellectual property courts will be set up in Shanghai and Southern Guangzhou. China has been criticized for its lack of enforcement of intellectual property rights, but in recent years, it has made several developments to its intellectual property laws.

The Pink Store Prevails

A business owner in Elkorn, Nebraska recently won a trademark battle against Limited Brands giant Victoria’s Secret. Beka Doolittle, owner of the online business “The Pink Store” has been going up against Victoria’s Secret this past year over use of the word “pink”. One of the notable brands of Victoria’s Secret is it’s Pink line that caters to young women. Ms. Doolittle’s online business carries items for all ages and items for the home, all themed as (you guessed it) pink. After Victoria’s Secret submitted a petition to cancel her mark on the United State Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) , Ms. Doolittle enlisted help in order to fight back, and it paid off. Victoria’s Secret finally backed off and cancelled their petition, but with no clear reason.

Luxury Beneath the Label: Protecting Your Brand at a Molecular Level with DNA Marking

By Christina Severino | amdlawgroup.com
The prevalence of counterfeit fashion has increasingly threatened the integrity and presence of luxury brands on a global stage. For every misspelled logo, clumsy stich or questionable cashmere sweater, profits collected from these counterfeits do more than fool the purchaser; they undermine the ingenuity of the original brand and potentially fund other criminal conduct that may go undiscovered.

Going Global: Don’t Get Lost in Translation

By Diana Chan | amdlawgroup.com
As businesses go global, catering to the local culture becomes an enormous factor in the success of the brand. Translations and images are often interpreted in different ways and what works in the United States may not be kindly accepted in another country. Even large corporations that spend millions of dollars on marketing have created failing campaigns from lack of research or minor mistakes.