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brand protection

Chanel Sues Chanel

Chanel, the corporation, claimed that Chanel’s Salon, LLC and Chanel Jones committed trademark infringement and trademark dilution of its brand name CHANEL. Because Chanel Jones used the trade names CHANEL’S SALON and CHANEL’S COSMETOLOGY SALON without Chanel’s permission, the industry filed a lawsuit alleging that she impinged on the company’s intellectual property rights. Prior to the lawsuit, Chanel sent a letter requesting Chanel Jones to change the name of her salon but there was no response and attempts to settle the dispute were unsuccessful.

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Nike Sues Former Designers Who Left to Work for Adidas

The ongoing battle for supremacy between Nike and Adidas has recently reached a new level. Last week, Nike initiated a suit against three former designers who decided to leave Nike for their competitor Adidas. The suit ask for upwards of $10 million in damages.

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Trump’s Copyright Battle with Queen

With GOP nominee Donald Trump’s recent antics and remarks, it does not come as a shock that Queen is less than pleased and trying to fight back against Trump’s use of the band’s famous hit “We Are the Champions.”

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Licensing for Small Businesses

An important aspect of intellectual property rights is the ability to create licensing agreements. However, an effective licensing agreement requires a few key factors.

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The Brand Protection Woes of the Fashion Brand Zara: Chinese Trademark “Hijacking”

News about Zara is all over the press lately. Zara’s founder, Amancio Ortega, recently surpassed Warren Buffet as the world’s second-richest man; several days later, the billionaire was also accused of being one of the most racist. Now, a $40 million discrimination lawsuit claiming he favors hiring employees who are “straight, Spanish and Christian”, has been filed against him. This lawsuit absolutely adds fuel to the flames for Zara, because remotely in China, Zara’s “backyard” is “on fire”.

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The First Step To Globally Protect Your Trademark

Unlike most countries, the United States follows the first to use rule when protecting trademark rights. This rule states that the trademark rights belong to the first party who uses the trademark of a certain product or service in commerce. In the United States, federal registration of a mark is not mandatory but can save time, money and prevent future infringement problems. Most countries enforce the first to file rule, which protects the trademark rights of the first party to file an application and receive registration for a certain product/service.

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A Tale of Two Stores: To Change or Not to Change

By Breanna Pendilton | amdlawgroup.com
With back to school shopping just around the corner, I can’t help but wonder what happened to some of my own favorite back to school stores. Stores like JC Penney’s and Abercrombie and Fitch were all the rage growing up when it was time to do school shopping and now, these two stores are basically non-existent. “What happened to them?” you ask: Change. With the times changing, stores like these found themselves plummeting in sales and holding on by a thread, literally.

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Doing the Most!: 50 Cent Expands Empire with New Disney Deal

Curtis “50 cent” Jackson is the classic rags to riches tale. He grew up on the streets of Jamaica Queens, NY, where he was shot 9 times, and managed to survive the encounter. One could make an argument that the 39 year old rapper was destined to give the world something great. Not only has the mogul churned out one of the best-selling rap albums of all time with his debut “Get Rich or Die Tryin” in 2003, but he has also become a successful actor, and one of the most savvy business men in the music industry. In conjunction with his condom brand, entitled “Magic Stick”, and one of the most lucrative beverage deals in history with his “Formula 50” Vitamin Water, the multi-talented Jackson has now entered the audio industry with a new headphone deal with Intel, SMS Audio, and Disney.

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Another Fashion Design Steal? Designer Leggings

Designer for Atelier de Geste, Beau Rhee was surprised to find one of the models in John Galliano’s debut show at London Fashion Week wearing a two-toned legging design that she featured in her own collection. Rhee watched the fashion show on Monday to see the Maison Margiela fashion show and was excited for the new haute couture fashion designs. Unsure whether the similar designs were simply coincidence or mere imitation, Rhee posted the pictures on Twitter and Instagram to receive her followers’ opinions.

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First Step to Federally Protecting Your Trademark

By Ann Marie Sallusti | amdlawgroup.com
Trademarks are not just a mark on a product. Trademarks make products identifiable to consumers and are essentially the product that is being sold. Trademarks “may” be federally registered with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), but registration is not mandatory in the United States. Unlike most countries, the United States follows the first to use rule when protecting trademark rights. The first to use rule protects the trademark rights of the first party who uses the trademark of a certain product or service in commerce. Therefore, if a creator satisfies the requirement of using the trademark in commerce in the United States, the creator’s work will be protected. On the other hand, most other countries follow the first to file rule when protecting trademark rights, which protects the trademark rights of the first party to file an application and receive registration for a certain product or service.

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Why Retailers Like Nasty Gal And Forever 21 Get Away With Knockoffs

Originally posted 2015-06-08 11:56:44. (By Kelsey Laugel – www.amdlawgroup.com) At the 2015 Billboard Music Awards in May, Nasty Gal, an American-based retailer that specializes in providing more affordable versions of designer clothing, claimed credit for Taylor Swift’s white Balmain jumpsuit. For comparison, the average Balmain jumpsuit can cost anywhere from $2,000 to $6,000 while the […]

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Why Women Will Continue Wearing Coach Handbags: The Psychology Behind Your Brand

Christina Serverino | amdlawgroup.com
Following my post last week regarding the blunders of outlet mall fashion, my curiosity led me to further focus on why (despite being out of style or season) consumers continue to flock in droves to discount retailers such as these, oftentimes in a stint of wanton disregard for the authority of the omnipresent “Fashion Police”. This curiosity led me to a Google search unveiling a patchwork of blog entries and even scholarly articles addressing the societal and scientific impact of consumer behavior and turnover rate of trends. The approaches of the bloggers and scientists seemed contradictory to one another: Bloggers expressed flagrant hostility towards certain trends, while researchers seemed to discredit such convictions, suggesting that the lust for luxury prevails. So what exactly is driving consumers to covet for couture: the product itself or elicited attention of the brand?

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