AMD LAW × GREGORIO SANCHEZ AT 2016 NYFW

Originally posted 2015-09-24 11:20:41. By Sindy Ding-Voorhees, www.amdlawgroup.com We are proud of our fashion brand Client —— Gregorio Sanchez —— for successfully presenting his 2016 Spring/Summer collection at Mercedes Benz New York Fashion Week. This is the brand’s second time showcasing at New York Fashion Week. Both times were cooperated with the prestigious bi-coastal fashion […]

Ready to Expand to China? Don’t Wait to Register Your Brand

By Diana Chan | amdlawgroup.com
Because of the sheer number of people (and potential consumers), businesses are often drawn to the idea of expanding their brand and marketing their products in China. But businesses should be wary when taking their brand to China especially if they have not yet registered their trademark in China.

Protecting Your Brand: From the Factory to the Stores

By Breanna Pendilton | amdlawgroup.com
It is important as a designer that you protect the image and reputation of your brand. In other words, you want the product that is hanging in the stores to be the product that you produced in the factory; nothing less and nothing more. This seems to be a common problem with “off the rack” designers. Even though you can no longer monitor the day to day whereabouts of your designs after it leaves your supervision, you still have rights which may help protect your brand in the future.

Protecting Your Brand: U.S. Customs and Border Patrol

By Diana Chan | amdlawgroup.com
Last summer, the United States Customs & Border Patrol (CBP) in Los Angeles, California, seized over 16,000 counterfeit Hermès handbags, valued at $295,665. If they were genuine Hermès handbags, the total retail price would have been nearly $211 million. In May of this year, CBP in Jersey City, New Jersey, intercepted 185 counterfeit guitars bearing trademarks such as Gibson, Les Paul, and Martin. The counterfeit guitars were being sold for $200 to $500, while the retail price of genuine models range from $2,000 to $54,000.

Global Protection for All ~ Everywhere

Intellectual property is a vital necessity for the success of any product or company. Whether protection in trademark, patent, copyright, or trade secret, individuals or corporations need to ensure that their branding and unique designs will not be diluted by counterfeiters or copycats. The fashion industry especially has struggled with the issue of intellectual property as the Court views clothing as more for functional purposes than a distinguished product. Changes in the U.S. patent law provide great opportunity for fashion designers to protect their designs not only in the United States, but also all over the world.

A Tale of Two Stores: To Change or Not to Change

By Breanna Pendilton | amdlawgroup.com
With back to school shopping just around the corner, I can’t help but wonder what happened to some of my own favorite back to school stores. Stores like JC Penney’s and Abercrombie and Fitch were all the rage growing up when it was time to do school shopping and now, these two stores are basically non-existent. “What happened to them?” you ask: Change. With the times changing, stores like these found themselves plummeting in sales and holding on by a thread, literally.

No Major Holiday Discounts for Michael Kors

Just when we thought the holiday season could not arrive any sooner, companies have already geared up for holiday shopping. Starbucks has begun promoting its holiday red cup and seasonal flavors, while the Wall Street Journal has set up a “Christmas Sale Tracker” that updates every hour to help readers monitor prices for the “hottest gifts.” As consumers prepare to buy gifts, they typically are looking for popular items at the lowest price. Michael Kors, however, is not planning on offering any promotion deals.

First Step to Federally Protecting Your Trademark

By Ann Marie Sallusti | amdlawgroup.com
Trademarks are not just a mark on a product. Trademarks make products identifiable to consumers and are essentially the product that is being sold. Trademarks “may” be federally registered with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), but registration is not mandatory in the United States. Unlike most countries, the United States follows the first to use rule when protecting trademark rights. The first to use rule protects the trademark rights of the first party who uses the trademark of a certain product or service in commerce. Therefore, if a creator satisfies the requirement of using the trademark in commerce in the United States, the creator’s work will be protected. On the other hand, most other countries follow the first to file rule when protecting trademark rights, which protects the trademark rights of the first party to file an application and receive registration for a certain product or service.

Gung Fu Scratch & the Avengers: Brand Positioning Done Well

Gung Fu Scratch & the Avengers: Brand Positioning Done Well

Avengers: Age of Ultron domestically grossed $191.3M dollars, and an impressive $631.1M internationally in its first week. Since, it has been reported by CNN the series earned $1B in just 24 days. These staggering numbers propel the Avengers franchise to adorn the number two spot, of top grossing series of all time. Age of Ultron did not disappoint. Tony Start was as witty and brilliant as ever, Bruce Banner was still attempting to come to terms with his “greener” side, and the villain in this particular installment gave the team an epic challenge.

It’s A Trademark… But It’s Not Actually a “Mark”

Trademark law has developed tremendously over time, thanks in huge part to the thriving field of technology. What was once a law dedicated generally to what people see, has now become a law dedicated also to what we hear. Just think about it. When you’re sitting on your couch at home watching TV and you hear, “Easy, Breezy, Beautiful”, you almost already know that this is a Cover Girl commercial. Or think about when you’re riding in your car listening to the radio, and you hear, “Ba Da Ba Ba Baaahhh, I’m Lovin’ It”, you automatically know that it’s a McDonald’s commercial. Increasingly, trademark law has not only come to protect words that you see as images, but words as you hear as slogans too.

How to #Registeryourhashtag

By Ann Marie Sallusti | amdlawgroup.com
Hashtags are any word or words that have the pound (or hash) symbol in front of them. They are used to get certain words to trend on the Internet via twitter, instagram, Facebook and other social media networks. Anything can be a hashtag. For example, #mybrand, #awesome, #dolls, #trademark, and #fashion. Hashtags can be used to trigger discussions via twitter and other social media websites. A user can register their hashtag using the twubs website and track the use their hashtag receives from the Internet and social media networks. Hashtags can help get a user circulate his/her idea across the market. Additionally, hashtags can emphasize a point the user is trying to make about an event in the world or a personal experience.