You Can’t Have My Blessing…Or The Music!

By Breanna Pendilton | amdlawgroup.com
Copyright law is founded upon the theory that it will promote and incentivize new works, while also giving credit to the originator.  But what happens when the owner of that work, will not share it?  Does that promote and incentivize new works?  Lifetime has recently announced its plans to make a biopic of the late singer Aaliyah, who died tragically in a plane crash at the age of 22 in 2001.  Her family, who was not contacted about the biopic, is not happy, and feels as if Aaliyah’s life was enough of a story to be told on the big screen.  But what can they really do right?  I mean, Aaliyah’s life, itself, is nothing but a bunch of facts.  In the eyes of copyright law, facts are not copyrightable, and Aaliyah’s family does not own her life story.

SiriusXM Appeals Copyright Ruling

he U.S. District Court of Appeals for California ruled against SiriusXM last week for airing music produced prior to the 1972. The laws of federal copyrights after 1972 expanded to cover master recordings. The lawsuit was filed by band songwriters Flo & Eddie of the Turtles. They sought $100 million in damages from the satellite radio company.

Court Date Set for Facebook Ad, Eminem Song Copyright Case

8 Mile Style, a song publisher for Eminem, filed a lawsuit in May against Facebook and Wieden & Kennedy, the advertising agency behind Facebook’s “Airplane” commercial for copyright infringement. The copyrighted song in question is “Under the Influence”, a collaboration piece between Eminem and rap group D12 off “The Marshall Mathers LP”, Eminem’s third and most successful studio album to date.

A Harlem Shake Infringement

Originally posted 2013-03-12 20:55:56. By Tasha Schmidt | amdlawgroup.com Have you heard of the “Harlem Shake?” The “Harlem Shake” is more than just a really popular video. Voices being heard in the background of the viral Internet hit on “Harlem Shake,” have caused quite the uproar. One of the individual’s whose voice can be heard […]

Counterfeit Fashion

Originally posted 2013-03-13 19:01:49. By Tasha Schmidt | amdlawgroup.com As many people’s wallets are getting tighter it seems more people are sacrificing buying genuine luxury goods and instead are investing in fake fashion goods. Counterfeit fashion and brand imitation is going on all over the world. Some people may unknowingly be buying fake products, as […]

Does a Primate have a Copyrightable Interest in its “Selfie”?

By Christina Severino | amdlawgroup.com
Recently, the Wikimedia Foundation was asked by British nature photographer David Slater to remove a “selfie” photograph taken by a primate with his camera. The Foundation refused, reasoning that because animals cannot hold a copyrightable interest, the images were in the “public domain”. As a result, Mr. Slater will likely pursue a legal action against the Foundation because the individual who uploaded the photo has not been located. His proposed argument is that the primate served as his assistant, thus affording him the copyright interest in the photos uploaded.

Protecting Your Brand: U.S. Customs and Border Patrol

By Diana Chan | amdlawgroup.com
Last summer, the United States Customs & Border Patrol (CBP) in Los Angeles, California, seized over 16,000 counterfeit Hermès handbags, valued at $295,665. If they were genuine Hermès handbags, the total retail price would have been nearly $211 million. In May of this year, CBP in Jersey City, New Jersey, intercepted 185 counterfeit guitars bearing trademarks such as Gibson, Les Paul, and Martin. The counterfeit guitars were being sold for $200 to $500, while the retail price of genuine models range from $2,000 to $54,000.

Beware of Nicknames and Trademarks

You might think that you are just using an innocent nickname but on the other hand maybe you are not. Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel teamed up with JMAN2 Enterprises LLC in December during football season to trademark, “Johnny Football.” However, neither the company nor Manziel cannot proceed to make money until he is out of the NCAA.

First Step to Federally Protecting Your Copyright

Many people may confuse a trademark and a copyright. A trademark is generally a word, phrase, symbol or design or a combination thereof, that identifies and distinguishes the source of the goods of one party from those of others.On the other hand, a copyright is the limited period of exclusive rights to copy, license, or otherwise exploit fixed literary or artistic expression.