Are B-Corp’s Better for Business?

On the question are B-Corp’s are better for business? It is clear that B-Corp’s are better for society. Over 26 states are changing the corporate landscape. These states capitalizing on one of the largest entrepreneurial and business booms of this decade. Most are familiar with the three, most prevalent, kinds of corporate formation structures in the U.S.; the C Corporation; the S Corporation, and the Limited Liability Company also known as the LLC. But 26 states, including the District of Columbia, have adopted a new form of business model; the B-Corporation. The B-Corporation represents a business model that promotes socially responsible investing, corporate social responsibility, and social entrepreneurship; while remaining profitable.

Staples vs. Shoplet – What do you think? – International Intellectual Property Law- Case Study #18

Originally posted 2012-09-08 14:11:44. The largest office supply retailer, Staples, is suing a much smaller rival, Shoplet.com, for trademark infringement, claiming that Shoplet’s logo and website too closely resembles its own. To understand the market domination Staples has over Shoplet, Staples is the nation’s No.1 office supply retailer and the No.2 internet retailer, while Shoplet […]

What is the definition of a “Born Global” firm? International Business Law – Case Study #2

The definition of a born global firm is “a business organization that, from inception, seeks to derive significant competitive advantage from the use of resources and the sale of outputs in multiple countries.” Many companies go global, but that does not make them born global firms. What distinguishes born global firms from the rest of international organizations is that they originate internationally. Born global firms, from their beginnings, have a global focus and commit their resources to international ventures. Most companies operate from their home country, and after years of doing business domestically, slowly evolve to do business internationally. By contrast, born global firms begin with a borderless world view, and immediately develop strategies to expand themselves abroad. Born global firms have many distinctive features that allow them to start, and thrive in the international arena.

Market Segmentation and Intellectual Property

Intellectual property is a very important resource, and it is no surprise Forbes Magazine has called it among the most important resources in the 21st century. Despite what product or service a business makes or provides, intellectual property is being created and used in some way. Whether it be a trademark or confidential information, it is important for a business to protect its intellectual property.

Tips for Marketing Your Fashion Business in China – International Business Law – Case Study #4

An example of a trademark would be the “swoosh” logo that we identify with Nike. The swoosh, “Just do it,” and the name itself, “Nike,” are all trademarked phrases or images that belong to the Nike Corporation. When we see the swoosh logo, hear “Just do it,” or see the word “Nike,” we immediately are reminded of the style of their shoes, their comfort, and the lifestyle that we expect to be offered from the organization. Because these images and phrases inspire such brand awareness and loyalty, they are very coveted. To ensure that Nike is the only organization that can make use of and profit from their logos and slogans, they have them trademarked. Trademarks are words, phrases, symbols or designs that identify and distinguish the source of the goods of one party from those of others.

Amazon Buys Comedy Service Rooftop Media to Expand Digital Content

Amazon is buying an online comedy Service Rooftop Media. At first this does not appear as an important transaction; however, Amazon’s goal is aimed toward a broader ambition of becoming a media and entertainment powerhouse. Amazon has concluded the deal through Audible an audiobooks service company that the firm bought for $300 Million in 2008.

International Corporate Compliance Support – Case Study #1

“KDBM Publishing” (a fictitious company) has recently expanded its business in Hong Kong, China. There, they face higher printing costs than back home in the United States. Members of KDBM have offered payment to local government officials in China to try and get discounted printing prices. This action constitutes bribery, and is in direct violation of the FCPA, or the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. The FCPA conceptually falls under a larger legal issue known as Corporate Compliance.

How can a startup’s owner have a good talk with a corporate lawyer?

Startup founders usually have fundamental strengths at some aspects, such as design, pitching, managing, etc., and yet also have weaknesses. Corporate law is something that is usually considered as a myth and a weakness for a lot of entrepreneurs and start-up owners. The concept of “entrepreneurship” is not just about pitching and managing, but the core of it is relationships.

Good relationships you want to nurture are with multiple parties:
• Attorneys, who you must nurture a close, reliable, comfortable relationship with, the attorney can help you get started, under legal protection, and guide you towards the right directions;
• Friends and families, where the initial funding usually comes from before getting investments from other sources;
• Incubators (think about the show “Silicon Valley”!)
• Co-creators (…and think about Marc Zuckerberg’s story in the film “Social Network”!)
• Mentors (free advice!)
• Customers!! At any time, startup owners need to be clear about who are their customers, even more clear than how they understand their technology.

Where to incorporate? – Delaware, Wisconsin, Nevada, or at Home?

By Ann Marie Sallusti | amdlawgroup.com
According to the internal affairs doctrine the state of incorporation will govern dealings and issues that are internal to the corporation, including but not limited to, fiduciary duties, shareholder rights, and other particular corporate issues. On the other hand, issues that are external to the operation of the corporation may be brought elsewhere. Therefore, a business owner’s decision to incorporate in a certain state determines what corporate law will govern the entity. A business owner should take legal issues, taxes, fees and incorporation requirements into consideration when deciding where to incorporate. Recently, business owners have been contemplating three states when determining where to incorporate – Delaware, Wisconsin and Nevada.