International Corporate Compliance Support – Case Study #1

“KDBM Publishing” (a fictitious company) has recently expanded its business in Hong Kong, China. There, they face higher printing costs than back home in the United States. Members of KDBM have offered payment to local government officials in China to try and get discounted printing prices. This action constitutes bribery, and is in direct violation of the FCPA, or the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. The FCPA conceptually falls under a larger legal issue known as Corporate Compliance.

George Washington University Law School Creates Unisex Restrooms

By: Marvin Hooker | Editor: Kristen Daly | www.amdlawgroup.com Restrooms that are characterized as non-gender are becoming more popular.  Anna Stolley Persky documents this societal change in an ABA Journal article.  According to Persky, George Washington University facilitated these changes by creating four unisex restrooms in its law school.  Initially, the school labeled a pre-existing […]

What is the definition of a “Born Global” firm? International Business Law – Case Study #2

The definition of a born global firm is “a business organization that, from inception, seeks to derive significant competitive advantage from the use of resources and the sale of outputs in multiple countries.” Many companies go global, but that does not make them born global firms. What distinguishes born global firms from the rest of international organizations is that they originate internationally. Born global firms, from their beginnings, have a global focus and commit their resources to international ventures. Most companies operate from their home country, and after years of doing business domestically, slowly evolve to do business internationally. By contrast, born global firms begin with a borderless world view, and immediately develop strategies to expand themselves abroad. Born global firms have many distinctive features that allow them to start, and thrive in the international arena.

Billionaire Richard Branson and Copyright – International Intellectual Property Law – Case Study #8

A copyright is a right to prevent others from using your originally authored work. To protect their creative ingenuity, as well as to ensure that they are the only ones who can make use of and profit from their material, authors of artistic or intellectual works have their material copyrighted. Those who have copyrighted material have many exclusive rights, such as the right to reproduce the work, distribute copies to the public for sale, and perform the work. Since anything you create can be copyrighted, copyrights can protect endless types of creative work. Some examples are recorded music, books, software codes, video games, paintings, plays, or sculptures.

International Intellectual Property – Case Study #1

Imagine a publishing firm based in the United States called “KDBM Publishing” (a fictitious company). At PJD, they specialize in novels of fictions, and children’s books. To protect the creative ingenuity of their authors, PJD has copyrighted all of their works. However, copyright laws in foreign countries work differently than those in the United States. For example, in Canada, the dissemination of digital files is legal as long as the distributor is not making a profit. In the United States however, this is as known as piracy, and is illegal. If a citizen of Canada had digital files of PJD Publishing’s works and decided to distribute them for free, although this would legal in Canada, they would be in violation of The United States copyright law. Creating a consistent legal framework internationally are the efforts of international intellectual property law. In achieving this, intellectual property owners do business internationally while being protected by global intellectual property standards.