My Interest in Patent Protection as a Legal Professional

When you come across something you are interested in what do you do?  For me, I research the topic to find out more as it leads to expanding my knowledge, understanding, and interest.  This is exactly what happened when I researched the law regarding patents, what defines a patent and why it is important to get protection for your inventions. 
My first sense of curiosity into patent law was the design of the Dyson vacuum cleaner, invented by the British inventor and industrial designer, Sir James Dyson. I remember seeing the vacuum cleaner for the first time and being amazed at a vacuum that does not need a bag.   My curiosity grew from there. 

Reinventing the Pizza Won’t Get You Trademark Protection

Last week, Judge Costa of the Southern District Court of Texas (Galveston Division) ruled against New York Pizzeria, Inc. (NYPI) on its claims for damages regarding infringement of its flavors and plating methods of its menu items. The suit was brought by former president of NYPI, Raviner Syal (Syal), claiming that he took advantage of his access to NYPI’s recipes, suppliers, and other internal documents. In doing so, NYPI claimed that Syal has created a similar restaurant chain, Gina’s Italian Kitchen (Gina’s), which includes items on its menu that mimic the flavor and uniqueness of NYPI’s cuisine.

Why the ALS Withdrew its Trademark Application

By Chloe Coska | amdlawgroup.com
Everyone is aware of the Ice Bucket Challenge these days. The meme has gone viral on the internet and throughout the world. From celebrities to the girl next door, everybody has been doing the challenge in order to raise awareness to fight amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a disease affecting the brain and spinal cord. The campaign so far has raised $94 million in less than a month.

Not Your Knot, Bottega Veneta’s Knot

The fashion brand, Bottega Veneta, well-known for its hand bangs and fragrances, had filed its unique “knot” design for trademark registration. Initially, the design was rejected by the USPTO because the knot was a non-distinctive product design and needed a secondary meaning. Bottega Veneta attempted to prove that its knot was distinctive through submitting its sales record, media coverage, high remarks from other fashion industry experts, and a comparison with other famous luxury brand marks.

Getting a Trademark for a “Controversial” Name

Originally posted 2013-03-20 18:04:34. By Tasha Schmidt | amdlawgroup.com It is important to trademark your name, especially when it is your band’s name, and this is exactly what this Asian rock group is attempting to do. Except the rock group is trying to trademark the name, “The Slants.” The band tried to trademark the name […]

Brand Protection:  Why it is important?

Brand Protection: Why it is important?

For years I have been flooding my sphere of influence with information about brand protection: what it is and why it is important. Ideas become protectable brands. The reason that the concept resonates with me is that I have fallen prey to running my mouth about a great idea that came to me in one of my daily daydreams and watched someone else bring the concept to reality. Sure, they beat me to the “punch” and here I was left with very little recourse. This taught me a valuable lesson about protecting your valuable content FAST.

The Tale of Trademark Registration: What Can Tyler Perry Teach You?

By Ozelle Martin | amdlawgroup.com
Tyler Perry is a highly acclaimed film creator, screen and play writer, actor and now, a new trademark owner. Recently, he was involved in a blistering trademark battle, in the case of Tyler Perry Studios, LLC v. Kimberly Kearney. The featured actor in this tale of the trademark registration of “What Would Jesus Do?” was “use in commerce.”

Tips for Marketing Your Fashion Business in China – International Business Law – Case Study #4

An example of a trademark would be the “swoosh” logo that we identify with Nike. The swoosh, “Just do it,” and the name itself, “Nike,” are all trademarked phrases or images that belong to the Nike Corporation. When we see the swoosh logo, hear “Just do it,” or see the word “Nike,” we immediately are reminded of the style of their shoes, their comfort, and the lifestyle that we expect to be offered from the organization. Because these images and phrases inspire such brand awareness and loyalty, they are very coveted. To ensure that Nike is the only organization that can make use of and profit from their logos and slogans, they have them trademarked. Trademarks are words, phrases, symbols or designs that identify and distinguish the source of the goods of one party from those of others.

Selling Counterfeits Online? Think Twice

In 2005, LVMH, a conglomerate that owns Louis Vuitton, Céline, Marc Jacobs, Möet & Chandon, Dom Pérignon, and several other luxury brands, brought an action in French court against Google for trademark infringement. Now, after a 10-year legal dispute, LVMH and Google have come to a settlement agreement and have decided to join together to fight the advertising and promotion of counterfeit products.

7th Circuit rules in favor of Catwoman!

By Christina Severino | amdlawgroup.com
The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit recently affirmed that security software company Fortres Grand has failed to state an adequate claim for trademark infringement against Warner Brothers under the Lanham Act (15 U.S.C. §§ 1114 and 1125)and for unfair competition under Indiana law. The district court held that Fortres Grand did not assert a conceivable theory of consumer confusion. In addition, the court ruled that Warner Brothers’ First Amendment right in using the words “the clean slate” remains intact.

First Step to Federally Protecting Your Trademark

By Ann Marie Sallusti | amdlawgroup.com
Trademarks are not just a mark on a product. Trademarks make products identifiable to consumers and are essentially the product that is being sold. Trademarks “may” be federally registered with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), but registration is not mandatory in the United States. Unlike most countries, the United States follows the first to use rule when protecting trademark rights. The first to use rule protects the trademark rights of the first party who uses the trademark of a certain product or service in commerce. Therefore, if a creator satisfies the requirement of using the trademark in commerce in the United States, the creator’s work will be protected. On the other hand, most other countries follow the first to file rule when protecting trademark rights, which protects the trademark rights of the first party to file an application and receive registration for a certain product or service.